• Productivity
    How Generative AI Adds Value to the Future of Work 这篇Upwork的文章深入探讨了生成式人工智能(AI)在重新塑造工作价值方面的变革力量,强调了自动化和创新不仅改变了工作岗位,还在各个行业提高了生产力和创造力。文章着重讨论了对劳动力市场的细微影响,强调了技能发展和道德考虑的重要性,并对人工智能与人类合作的未来提供了前瞻性的视角。 Authors:  Dr. Ted Liu, Carina Deng, Dr. Kelly Monahan Generative AI’s impact on work: lessons from previous technology advancements In this study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the initial impact of generative AI (artificial intelligence) on the Upwork marketplace for independent talent. Evidence from previous technological innovations suggests that AI will have a dual impact: (1) the displacement effect, where job or task loss is initially more noticeable as technologies automate tasks, and (2) the reinstatement effect, where new jobs and tasks increase earnings over time as a result of the new technology. Take for example the entry of robotics within the manufacturing industry. When robotic arms were installed along assembly lines, they displaced some of the tasks that humans used to do. This was pronounced in tasks that were routine and easy to automate. However, new tasks were then needed with the introduction of robotics, such as programming the robots, analyzing data, building predictive models, and maintaining the physical robots. The effects of new technologies often counterbalance each other over time, giving way to many new jobs and tasks that weren’t possible or needed before. The manufacturing industry is now projected to have more jobs available as technologies continue to advance, including Internet of Things (IoT), augmented reality, and AI, which transform the way work is completed. The issue now at hand is ensuring enough skilled workers are able to work alongside these new technologies. While this dynamic of displacement and reinstatement generally takes years to materialize, as noted above in the manufacturing example, the effects of generative AI may be taking place already on Upwork. For the platform as a whole, we observe that generative AI has increased the total number of job posts and the average spend per new contract created. In terms of work categories, generative AI has reduced demand in writing and translation, particularly in low-value work, while enhancing earnings in high-value work across all groups. In particular, work that relies on this new technology like Data Science and Analytics are reaping the benefits. The report highlights the importance of task complexity and the skill-biased nature of AI's impact. Skills-biased technology change is to be expected as the introduction of new technologies generally favors highly skilled workers. We observe this on our platform as high-skill freelancers in high-value work are benefiting more, while those in low-value work face challenges, underscoring the need for skilling and educational programs to empower freelancers to adapt and transition in this evolving work landscape. Understanding the lifecycle of work on Upwork and the impact of gen AI Generative AI has a growing presence in how people do their work, especially since the public release of ChatGPT in 2022. While there’s been extensive discussion about the challenges and opportunities of generative AI, there is limited evidence of such impact based on transaction data in the broader labor market. In this study, we use Upwork’s platform data to estimate the short-term effects of generative AI on freelance outcomes specifically. The advantage of the Upwork platform is that it is in itself a complete marketplace for independent talent, as we observe the full life cycle of work: job posts, matching, work execution, performance reviews, and payment. Few other instances exist where a closed-system work market can be studied and observed. Thus, the results of this study offer insights into not only the online freelance market, but also the broader labor market. How technological progress disrupts the labor market is not a new topic. Acemoglu and Restrepo (2019) argue that earning gain arises from new tasks created by technological progress, which they term the “reinstatement effect,” even if the automation of certain tasks may have a displacement effect in the labor market initially. What this means is that there may be a dynamic effect going on: the displacement effect (e.g., work loss) may be more noticeable in the beginning of a new technology entry, but as new jobs and tasks are being created, the reinstatement effect (e.g., rates increase, new work) will begin to prevail. In the broader labor market, such dynamics will likely take years to materialize. But in a liquid and active independent work marketplace like Upwork, it’s possible that we’re already observing this transition happening. Existing studies such as this provides a useful conceptual framework to think about the potential impact of generative AI. It’s likely that in the short term, the replacement of generative AI will continue to be more visible, not just at Upwork, but also in the broader labor market. Over time and across work categories, however, generative AI will likely spur new tasks and jobs, leading to the reinstatement effect becoming stronger and increasing rates for those occupations with new tasks and a higher degree of task complexity. We’ve already seen evidence of new demand as a result of gen AI on our Upwork platform, with brand new skill categories like AI content creator and prompt engineer emerging in late 2022 and early 2023. We test this hypothesis of both work displacement and reinstatement, and provide insights into how generative AI affects work outcomes. Impact of generative AI on work To understand the short-term impact of generative AI on the Upwork freelance market, we capitalize on a natural experiment arising from the public release of ChatGPT in November 2022. Because this release was largely an unanticipated event to the general public, we’re able to estimate the causal impact of generative AI. The essential idea behind this natural experiment is that we want to compare the work groups affected by AI with the counterfactual in which they are not. To implement this, we use a statistical and machine-learning method called synthetic control. Synthetic control allows us to see the impact that an intervention, in this case, the introduction of gen AI, has on a group over time by comparing it to a group with similar characteristics not exposed to the intervention. The advantage of this approach is that it allows us to construct reasonably credible comparison groups and observe the effect over time. The units of analysis we use are work groups on the Upwork platform; we analyze variables such as contract number and freelancer earnings. Instead of narrowly focusing on a single category like writing, we extend the analysis to all the major work groups on Upwork. Moreover, we conduct additional analysis of the more granular clusters within each major group. The synthetic control method allows for flexibility in constructing counterfactuals at different levels of granularity. The advantage of our comprehensive approach is that we offer a balanced view of the impact of generative AI across the freelance market. Generative AI’s short-term impact on job posts and freelancer earnings Looking at the platform as a whole, we observe that generative AI has increased the total number of job posts by 2.4%, indicating the overall increased demand from clients. Moreover, as shown in Figure 1, for every new job contract, there is an increase of 1.3% in terms of freelancer earnings per contract, suggesting a higher value of contracts. Figure 1 Effect of Generative AI on Freelancer Earning per Contract The Upwork platform has three broad sectors: 1. Technological and digital solutions (tech solutions); 2. Creative & outreach; 3. Business operations and consulting. We have observed both positive and negative effects within each of the sectors, but two patterns are worth noting: The reinstatement effect of generative AI seems to be driving growth in freelance earnings in sectors related to tech solutions and business operations. In contrast, within the creative sector, while sales and marketing earnings have grown because of AI, categories such as writing and translation seem disproportionately affected more by the replacement effect. This is to be expected due to the nature of tasks within these categories of work, where large language models are now able to efficiently process and generate text at scale. Generative AI has propelled growth in high-value work across the sectors and may have depressed growth in low-value work. This supports a skills-biased technology change argument, which we’ve observed throughout modern work history. More specifically and within tech solutions, data science & analytics is a clear winner, with over 8% of growth in freelance earnings attributed to generative AI. This makes sense as the reinstatement effect is at work; new work and tasks such as prompt engineering have been created and popularized because of generative AI. Simultaneously, while tools such as ChatGPT automate certain scripting tasks (therefore leading to a replacement effect), it mainly results in productivity enhancements for freelancers and potentially leads to them charging higher rates and enjoying higher overall earnings per task. In terms of contracts related to business operations, we observe that accounting, administrative support, and legal services all experience gains in freelance earnings due to generative AI, ranging from 6% to 7%. In this sector, customer service is the only group that has experienced reduced earnings (-4%). The reduced earnings result for customer service contracts is an example of the aggregate earnings outcomes of AI, related to the study by Brynjolfsson et al (2023), who find that generative AI helps reduce case resolution time at service centers. A potential outcome of this cut in resolution time is that service centers will need fewer workers, as more tasks can be completed by a person working alongside AI. At the same time, the reinstatement effect has not materialized yet because there are no new tasks being demanded in such settings. This may be an instance where work transformation has not yet been fully realized, with AI enabling faster work rather than reinventing a way of working that leads to new types of tasks. A contrasting case is the transformation that happened with bank tellers when ATMs were introduced. While the introduction of these new technologies resulted in predictions of obsolete roles in banks, something different happened over time. Banks were able to increase efficiency as a result of ATMs and were able to scale and open more branches than before, thereby creating more jobs. In addition, the transactional role of a bank teller became focused on greater interpersonal skills and customer relationship tasks. When taken together, the overall gains in such business operations work on Upwork are an encouraging sign. These positions tend to require relatively intensive interpersonal communication, and it seems the short-term effects of generative AI have helped increase the value of these contracts, similar to what we saw in the banking industry when ATMs were introduced. As of now, the replacement effect of AI seems more noticeable in creative and outreach work. The exception is sales and marketing contracts, which have experienced a 6.5% increase in freelance earnings. There is no significant impact yet observed on design. For writing and translation, however, generative AI seems to have reduced earnings by 8% and 10% respectively. However, as we will discover, task complexity has a moderating effect on this. High-value work benefit from generative AI, upskilling needed for low-value work Having discussed the overall impact of generative AI across categories, we now decompose the impact by values. The reason we’re looking at the dimension of work value is that there may be a positive correlation between contract value and skill complexity. Moreover, skill complexity may also be positively correlated with skill levels. Essentially, by evaluating the impact of AI by different contract values, we can get at the question of AI's impact by skill levels. This objective is further underscored by a discrepancy that sometimes exists in the broader labor markets – a skills gap between demand and supply. It simply takes time for upskilling to take place, so it’s typical for demand to exceed supply until a more balanced skilled labor market takes place. It is worth noting, however, freelancers on the Upwork platform seem more likely than non-freelancers to acquire new skills such as generative AI. For simplicity, let’s assume that the value of contracts is a good proxy for the level of skill required to complete them. We’d then assume that high-skill freelancers typically do high-value work, and low-skill freelancers do low-value work. In other words, our goal is also to understand whether the impact of generative AI is skills-biased and follows a similar pattern from what we’ve seen in the past with new technology disruptions. Note that we’re focusing on the top and bottom tails of the distribution of contract values, because such groups (rather than median or mean) might be most susceptible to displacement and/or reinstatement effects, therefore of primary concern. We define high-value (HV) work as those with $1,000 or more earnings per contract. For the remaining contracts, we focus on a subset of work as low-value (LV) work ($251-500 earnings). Figure 2 shows the impact of AI by work value, across groups on Upwork. As we discussed before, writing and translation work has experienced some reduction in earnings overall. However, if we look further into the effect of contract value, we see that the reduction is largely coming from the reduced earnings from low-value work. At the same time, for these two types, generative AI has induced substantial growth in high-value earnings – the effect for translation is as high as 7%. We believe the positive effect on translation high-value earning is driven by more posts and contracts created. In the tech solutions sector, the growth in HV earnings in data science and web development is also particularly noticeable, ranging from 6% to 9%. Within the business solutions sector, administrative support is the clear winner. There are two takeaways from this analysis by work value. First, while we’re looking at a sample of all the contracts on the platform, it’s possible that the decline of LV work is more than made up for by the growth of HV work in the majority of the groups. In other words, except for select work groups, the equilibrium results for the Upwork freelance market overall seem to be net positive gains from generative AI. Second, if we assume that freelancers with high skills (or a high degree of skill complexity) tend to complete such HV work (and low-skill freelancers do LV work), we observe that the impact of generative AI may be biased against low-skill freelancers. This is an important result: In the current discussion of whether generative AI is skill-based, there exists limited evidence based on realized gains and actual work market transactions. We are one of the first to provide market-transaction-based evidence to illustrate this potentially skill-biased impact. Finally, additional internal Upwork analysis finds that independent talent engaged in AI-related work earn 40% more on the Upwork marketplace than their counterparts engaged in non-AI-related work. This suggests there may be additional overlap between high-skill work and AI-related work, which can further reinforce the earning potential of freelancers in this group. Figure 2 Case study: 3D content work To illustrate the impact of generative AI in more depth, we have conducted a case study of Engineering & Architecture work within the tech solutions sector. The reason is that we want to illustrate the potentially overlooked aspects of AI impact, compared with the examples of data science and writing contracts. This progress in generative AI has the potential to reshape work in traditional areas like design in manufacturing and architecture, which rely heavily on computer-aided design (CAD) objects, and newer sectors such as gaming and virtual reality, exemplified by NVIDIA's Omniverse. Based on activities on the Upwork platform, we see that there is consistent growth of job posts and client spending in this category, with up to 12% of gross service value growth year over year in 2023 Q3, and over 11% in job posts during the same period. Moreover, applying the synthetic control method, we show a causal relationship between gen AI advancements and the growth in job posts and earnings per contract. More specifically, there is a significant increase in overall earnings because of AI, an average 11.5% increase. Additionally, as shown by Figure 3, the positive effect also applies to earning per contract. This indicates a positive impact on freelancer productivity and quality of work, due to the fact that we’re measuring the income for every unit of work produced. This suggests that gen AI is not just a facilitator of efficiency but also enhances the quality of output. ‍Figure 3 Effect of Generative AI on Freelancer Earning per Contract in EngineeringIn a traditional workflow to create 3D objects without generative AI, freelancers would spend extensive time and effort to design the topology, geometry, and textures of the objects. But with generative AI, they can do so through text prompts to train models and generate 3D content. For example, this blog by NVIDIA’s Omniverse team showcases how ChatGPT can interface with traditional 3D creation tools. Thus, the positive trajectory of generative AI in 3D content generation we see is driven by several factors. AI significantly reduces job execution time, allowing for higher productivity. It facilitates the replication and scaling of 3D objects, leading to economies of scale. Moreover, freelancers can now concentrate more on the creative aspects of 3D content, as AI automates time-consuming and tedious tasks. This shift has not led to a decrease in rates due to the replacement effect. In fact, this shift of workflow may create new tasks and work. We will likely see a new type of occupation in which technology and humanities disciplines converge. For instance, a freelancer trained in art history now has the tools to recreate a 3D rendering of Japan in the Edo period, without the need to conduct heavy coding. In other words, the reinstatement effect of AI will elevate the overall quality and value proposition of the work, and ultimately enable higher earning gains. This paradigm shift underscores generative AI's role in not just transforming work processes but also in creating new economic dynamics within the 3D content market. Fortunately, it seems many freelancers on Upwork are ready to reap the benefits: 3D-related skills, such as 3D modeling, rendering, and design, are listed among the top five skills of freelancer profiles as well as in job posts. A dynamic interplay: task complexity, skills, and gen AI Focusing on the Upwork marketplace for independent talent, we study the impact of generative AI by using the public release of ChatGPT as a natural experiment. The results suggest a dynamic interplay of replacement and reinstatement effects; we argue that this dynamic is influenced by task complexity, suggesting a skill-biased impact of gen AI. Analysis across Upwork's work sectors shows varied effects: growth in freelance earnings in tech solutions and business operations, but a mixed impact in the creative sector. Specifically, high-value work in data science and business operations see significant earnings growth, while creative contracts like writing and translation experience a decrease in earnings, particularly in lower-value tasks. Using the case study of 3D content creation, we show that generative AI can significantly enhance productivity and quality of work, leading to economic gains and a shift toward higher-value tasks, despite initial concerns of displacement. Acemoglu and Restrepo (2019) argue that the slowdown of earning growth in the United States the past three decades can partly be explained by new technologies’ replacement effect overpowering the reinstatement effect. But with generative AI, we’re at a point of completely redefining what human tasks mean, and there may be ample opportunities to create new tasks and work. It's evident that while high-value types of work are being created, freelancers engaged in low-value tasks may face negative impact, possibly due to a lack of skills needed to capitalize on AI benefits. This situation underscores the necessity of supporting freelancers not only in elevating their marketability within their current domains but also in transitioning to other work categories. To ensure as many people as possible benefit, there’s an imperative need to provide educational resources for them to gain the technical skills, and more importantly skills of adaptability to reinvent their work. This helps minimize the chance of missed opportunities by limiting skills mismatch between talent and new demands created by new technologies. Upwork has played a significant role here by linking freelancers to resources such as Upwork Academy’s AI Education Library and Education Marketplace, thereby equipping them with the necessary tools and knowledge to adapt and thrive in an AI-present job market. This approach can help bridge the gap between low- and high-value work opportunities, ensuring a more equitable distribution of the advantages brought about by generative AI. Methodology To estimate the causal impact of generative AI, we take a synthetic control approach in the spirit of Abadie, Diamond, and Hainmueller (2010). The synthetic control method allows us to construct a weighted combination of comparison units from available data to create a counterfactual scenario, simulating what would have happened in the absence of the intervention. We use this quasi-experimental method due to the infeasibility of conducting a controlled large-scale experiment. Additionally, we use Lasso regularization to credibly construct the donor pool that serves the basis of the counterfactuals and minimize the chance of overfitting the data. Moreover, we supplement the analysis by scoring whether a sub-occupation is impacted or unaffected by generative AI. The scoring utilizes specific criteria: 1. Whether a certain share of job posts are tagged as AI contracts by the Upwork platform; 2. AI occupational exposure score, based on a study by Felten, Raj, and Seamans (2023), to tag these sub-occupations. We also use data smoothing techniques through three-month moving averages. We analyzed data collected on our platform from 2021 through Q3 2023. We specifically look at freelancer data across all 12 work categories on the platform for high-value contracts, defined as those with a contract of at least $1,000, and low-value contracts, consisting of those between $251 and under $500. The main advantage of our approach is that it is a robust yet flexible way to identify the causal effects on not only the Upwork freelance market but also specific work categories. Additionally, we control for macroeconomic or aggregate shocks such as U.S. monetary policy in the pre-treatment period. However, we acknowledge the potential biases in identifying which sub-occupations are influenced by generative AI and the effects of external factors in the post-treatment period. About the Upwork Research Institute The Upwork Research Institute is committed to studying the fundamental shifts in the workforce and providing business leaders with the tools and insights they need to navigate the here and now while preparing their organization for the future. Using our proprietary platform data, global survey research, partnerships, and academic collaborations, we produce evidence-based insights to create the blueprint for the new way of work. About Ted Liu Dr. Ted Liu is Research Manager at Upwork, where he focuses on how work and skills evolve in relation to technological progress such as artificial intelligence. He received his PhD in economics from the University of California, Santa Cruz. About Carina Deng Carian Deng is the Lead Analyst in Strategic Analytics at Upwork, where she specializes in uncovering data insights through advanced statistical methodologies. She holds a Master's degree in Data Science from George Washington University. About Kelly Monahan Dr. Kelly Monahan is Managing Director of the Upwork Research Institute, leading our future of work research program. Her research has been recognized and published in both applied and academic journals, including MIT Sloan Management Review and the Journal of Strategic Management.
    Productivity
    2024年02月23日
  • Productivity
    Google Workspace推出Gemini:开启AI增强生产力的新篇章 Google Workspace推出了为各种规模的组织设计的Gemini Business计划,以及一个全新的、具有企业级数据保护的独立Gemini聊天体验。Gemini Business计划每用户每月20美元起,提供包括文档和邮件中的写作帮助、表格中的增强智能填充和幻灯片中的图像生成等功能。Gemini Enterprise计划则以每用户每月30美元提供更多使用量和额外的AI驱动会会议的AI功能,如闭幕字幕的翻译和会议记录。 此外,Gemini还提供了一个独立的企业级聊天体验,通过使用最大且最有能力的1.0 Ultra模型,确保了企业级的数据保护,不用于广告目的或改进生成机器学习技术,不被人工审查或与其他用户或组织共享。这些更新旨在提高工作效率和团队合作,同时保障用户数据的安全和隐私。 2024年2月21日 — Google Workspace引入了Gemini Business和Gemini Enterprise,这标志着在其套件内整合人工智能的重大进步。由Aparna Pappu(副总裁兼总经理)领衔的这一举措旨在满足组织多样化的需求,用AI增强日常操作。 向前迈出的革命性一步 本月,Google宣布Duet AI转变为Google Workspace的Gemini,提供了对先进AI模型的访问。此次升级将Gemini集成到广泛使用的Workspace应用中,旨在简化从个人事件规划到复杂商业战略制定等任务。 用AI赋能企业 以每用户每月20美元(需年度承诺)的竞争价格推出的Gemini Business,旨在为所有规模的组织普及生成式AI技术的使用。它提供了如Docs和Gmail中的“帮我写”,Sheets中的“增强智能填充”以及Slides中的图像生成等功能,目的是提高生产力和创造力。 以每用户每月30美元的价格,Gemini Enterprise扩展了这些功能,并增加了AI驱动会议的附加特性,包括实时翻译100多种语言以及即将推出的会议记录功能。现有的Duet AI客户将自动过渡到这个增强计划。 交互的新维度 一个突出的特点是与Gemini的新独立聊天体验,利用1.0 Ultra模型进行更深入、更有洞察力的互动。这个平台承诺提供企业级数据保护,确保通信的隐私和安全。 展望未来 Google Workspace不仅在增强当前的商业和企业产品,还在探索扩展到教育领域。这一举措反映了Google利用AI提高各类用户群体的效率和创新的承诺。 Gemini for Workspace代表了企业、教育机构和个人利用AI实现更大生产力和创造力的关键发展。随着Google Workspace的持续演进,Gemini的整合预示着一个技术和人类智慧无缝融合的未来。
    Productivity
    2024年02月21日
  • Productivity
    2024年人力资源预测:全球追求生产力 In this fast-evolving era, all companies and individuals are seeking for change and efficiency. We can see the core of productivity in the new year: AI. Let's have a look at details on the Josh Bersin Predictions for 2024. 在过去的二十年里,我一直在写关于人力资源预测的文章,但今年不同。我看到这一年打破了范式,改变了商业中的每一个角色。不仅人工智能会改变每家公司和每一项工作,而且公司将开始不懈地寻求生产力。 想想我们的过去。2008年金融危机后,世界开始了加速增长的零利率时期。公司增加了收入,雇用了员工,并看着他们的股价上涨。招聘继续以狂热的速度进行,导致2019年底失业率创下3.5%的历史新低。 随之而来的是大流行,在六个月内,一切都停滞不前。2020年4月,失业率飙升至15%,公司将人们送回家,我们重新设计了我们的产品、服务和经济,以应对远程工作、混合工作制和对心理健康的关注。 一旦经济再次启动(由于美国的财政刺激),公司又回到了旧的招聘周期。但随着利率上升和需求不足,我们看到裁员一再发生,在过去的18个月里,我们看到了招聘、裁员,然后再次招聘以复苏经济。 为什么会出现跷跷板效应? 首席执行官和首席财务官正处于我们所说的“工业时代”——招聘以增长经济,然后在事情好转时裁员。 今天,当我们进入2024年时,一切都不同了。我们必须“囤积人才”,投资于生产力,并重新开发和重新部署人员以实现增长。 我们生活在一个失业率为 3.8% 的世界,几乎每个职位都存在劳动力短缺,劳动力权力日益增强,员工需求不断涌现:对加薪、灵活性、自主权和福利的要求。每年有超过20%的美国员工换工作(每月2.3%),其中近一半的变化是进入新行业。 为什么这是“新常态”? 有几个原因。首先,正如我们在全球劳动力情报研究中所讨论的那样,行业是重叠的。每家公司都是数字化公司;每家公司都希望建立经常性收入来源;很快,每家公司都将使用人工智能。过去停留在行业内的职业正在转变为“基于技能的职业”,让人们比以往任何时候都更容易跳槽。 其次,员工(尤其是年轻员工)感到有权按照自己的意愿行事。他们可能会悄悄地辞职,“做兼职”,或者抽出时间转行。他们看到自己的生活很长(人们的寿命比 1970 年代和 1980 年代长得多),所以他们不介意离开你的公司去其他地方。 第三,生育率持续下降,劳动力短缺加剧。日本、中国、德国和英国的劳动力人口都在萎缩。在未来十年左右的时间里,大多数其他发达经济体也将如此。 第四,工会正在崛起。由于华盛顿的新理念,我们看到了谷歌、亚马逊、星巴克、GM、福特、Stellantis、凯撒、迪士尼、Netflix等公司的劳工活动。虽然工会参与率不到美国劳动力的11%,但在欧洲要高得多,而且这一趋势正在上升。 这一切意味着什么? 这有很多影响。 首先,公司将更加专注于建立高保留率的工作模式(有人称之为“劳动力囤积”)。这意味着改善薪酬公平,继续混合工作模式,投资于以人为本的领导力,并为员工提供在公司内部从事新职业的机会。这就是为什么人才市场、基于技能的发展和工作流程中的学习如此重要的原因。 其次,CEO必须了解员工的需求、愿望和要求。正如爱德曼的最新研究表明的那样,职业发展现在位居榜首,同时对授权、影响力和信任的渴望也排在首位。我们称之为“员工激活”的新主题:倾听员工的意见,并将有关他们工作的决定委托给他们的经理、团队和领导者。 第三,传统的“雇佣成长”模式并不总是奏效。在这个后工业时代,我们必须系统地运作,将内部发展、工作再设计、经验和招聘放在一起。这汇集了招聘、奖励和薪酬、学习与发展以及组织设计等独立领域。(阅读我们的系统性人力资源研究了解更多信息。) “业务绩效”的真正含义是什么? 如果你是首席执行官,你希望增长收入、增加市场份额、提高盈利能力和可持续性。如果你不能通过招聘来成长(而员工不断以奇怪的方式“激活”),你还有什么选择?这很简单:您可以自动化生产并专注于生产力。 虽然这张图表令人印象深刻,但它给每个CEO都引出了一个问题:我们在这张图表上的位置是什么?我们的运营速度是否与同行一样快、一样高效? 我认为这导致了一种我称之为“生产力优势”的策略。如果你能帮助你的公司更快地发展(生产力意味着速度,而不仅仅是利润),你就可以比你的竞争对手更快地进行重塑。这才是真正让CEO们夜不能寐的原因。 考虑一下普华永道最新的CEO调查数据。今年,我们必须比以往任何时候都更快地重塑我们的公司。到2024年,45%的CEO(去年为39%)认为他们的业务在十年内将无法生存。 生产力优势 为什么生产力如此重要?有四个原因。 首先,CEO们关心它。 2024 年普华永道 CEO 调查发现,CEO 认为公司 40%的工作浪费了生产力。 尽管这听起来令人震惊,但对我来说却是真实的:太多的电子邮件、太多的会议、混乱的招聘流程、官僚主义的绩效管理等等。(HR 就有其中一些问题。) 其次,AI让人生产力优势成为可能。 人工智能的应用旨在提高白领的生产力。(过去大多数自动化都有助于蓝领或灰领工人。)生成式 AI 让我们能够更快地查找信息,了解趋势和异常值,训练自己和学习,并清理我们随身携带的文档、工作流程、门户以及后台合规和管理混乱的系统。 第三,公司的发展需要AI。 当很难找招聘到人时,你将如何成长?去年,招聘时间增加了近20%,就业市场变得更加艰难。你能在技术技能上与谷歌或OpenAI竞争吗? 内部开发、重组和自动化项目就是答案。有了生成式人工智能,机会无处不在。 第四,生产力推动重塑。 如果你考虑重塑你公司(新产品、利用人工智能、进入新市场等)的需求,最大的障碍是惯性。为什么诺基亚和黑莓的手机业务输给了苹果?因为这些公司“又胖又快乐”。在这个人才和技能短缺的时代,这是灾难的根源。 普华永道(PwC)估计,“效率低下”产生了对GDP10万亿美元的税收,相当于全球GDP的7%。这种税收阻碍了您的公司转型。每当我们简化、减少会议并更好地定义决策权时,我们都会加快并实现变革。 这一切对人力资源意味着什么? 正如我在《人力资源预测》中所描述的那样,我们有很多问题需要解决。 我们必须加快向动态工作和组织结构的转变。我们必须专注于和务实地对待技能。我们必须重新思考“员工体验”,并处理我们所说的“员工激活”。我们将不得不对我们的人力资源技术、招聘和L&D系统进行现代化改造,以利用人工智能并使这些系统更加有用。 我们的人力资源团队也将由人工智能驱动。正如我们的Galileo™客户告诉我们的那样,一个架构良好的“专家助理”可以彻底改变人力资源人员的工作方式。我们可以成为“全栈”人力资源专业人员,在几秒钟而不是几周内找到有关我们团队的数据,几秒钟与一线领导分享人力资源、领导力和管理实践。(Galileo被一些世界上最大的公司用作管理教练。) 还有一些其他变化。随着公司专注于“通过生产力实现增长”,我们必须考虑每周 4 天的工作制,我们如何将混合工作制度化,以及如何以更有效的方式连接和支持远程工作者。我们必须重新关注领导力发展,在一线经理身上花费更多的时间和金钱,并继续投资于文化和包容性。我们必须简化和重新思考绩效管理,我们必须解决令人头疼的薪酬公平问题。 还有更多。 DEI 计划必须嵌入到业务中(人力资源 DEI 警察的时代已经结束)。我们必须清理我们的员工数据,以便我们的人工智能和人才情报系统准确且值得信赖。正如我们的系统性人力资源研究所指出的那样,我们必须将思维从“支持业务”转变为“成为有价值的顾问”,并将我们的人力资源服务产品化。 所有这些都在我们本周发布的40页新报告“2024 年人力资源预测”中进行了详细说明,其中包括一系列行动计划,以帮助您思考所有这些问题。 让我提醒你一个大观念。生产力是人力资源部门存在的原因。 我们所做的一切,从招聘到辅导,从开发到组织设计,只有在帮助公司成长的情况下才能成功。作为人员流动、敬业度、技能和领导力方面的专家,我们人力资源部门每天都在提高员工和组织的生产力。2024年是专注于这一更高使命的一年。 最后一件事:照顾好自己。 该报告有15个详细的预测,每个预测都有一系列需要考虑的行动步骤。最后一个真正适合你:专注于人力资源的技能和领导力。作为流程的管理者,我们必须专注于我们自己的能力。2024年将是成长、学习和团队合作的一年。如果我们处理好这15个问题,我们将帮助我们的公司在未来一年蓬勃发展。 Josh Bersin预测的详细信息 预测研究是我们每年阅读量最大的报告。它包括我们所有研究的详细摘要,并讨论了首席执行官、首席人力资源官和人力资源专业人士的15个基本问题。它将以以下形式提供: 包含详细信息的信息图。(点击这里) Source JOSH BERSIN
    Productivity
    2024年02月01日
  • Productivity
    2024 年工作场所沟通状况 随着在家工作的劳动力比例增加到 58%(9200 万人),数字通信已成为工作场所沟通和生产力的焦点。经过分析,《福布斯顾问》发现科罗拉多州和马里兰州的远程工作者数量最多。调查还发现,28% 的受访者表示使用互联网语音协议 (VoIP) 电话系统。虽然我们调查的一半受访者在混合环境中工作,但 27% 的受访者远程工作,20% 的受访者现场工作。 要点 员工平均每周花费 20 个小时使用数字通信工具。 由于使用数字通信,45% 的员工感觉与团队的联系更加紧密。 数字通信让 58% 的员工觉得他们需要更频繁地联系。 百分之六十的员工因数字化沟通而感到更加倦怠。 近一半的员工表示,他们的生产力受到无效沟通的影响。 42% 的员工在试图形成传达正确语气的反应时感到压力。 2023 年工作场所使用的通讯工具 尽管如今有许多其他通信平台,但电话的时代可能还没有过去。工人们发现,更有效的通信平台取决于其提供的通信类型,无论是即时消息、视频通话还是 VoIP 系统。Google Meet 和 Zoom 在视频通话方面排名最高,分别有 40% 和 46% 的受访者使用。 远程和混合工作人员比办公室工作人员更频繁地使用 VoIP 系统进行通信。超过四分之一的受访者使用 VoIP 系统,其中 37% 的远程员工使用该系统,23% 的现场员工使用该系统,24% 的混合员工使用该系统。 适合办公室员工、混合员工和远程员工的最有效的通信工具 最有效的沟通工具因现场、远程和混合工作人员而异。对于现场工作人员来说,38% 的受访者认为手机是最有效的沟通方式,其次是固定电话 (22%) 和 Zoom (21%)。对于远程工作的人来说,22% 的受访者认为 Zoom 是最有效的方法,Google Chat(同样是 22%)也是如此。混合型员工也遵循类似的趋势:31% 的人认为 Zoom 是最有效的,23% 的人认为 Google Meet 是最有效的。 Covid-19 如何继续影响工作沟通 大多数人在工作中会使用标准电话以外的工具进行沟通,其中 14% 的受访者在大流行之前没有使用VoIP 。其中超过 20% 是远程工作者。显然,越来越多的人开始使用 Zoom(占受访者的 24%),但 2020 年 3 月 1 日之后,手机的使用量也激增了 20%。 自 Covid-19 以来,超过 40% 的员工感觉与团队的联系更加紧密 虽然 Covid-19 改变了办公室和团队的沟通方式,但这并不一定会导致员工感觉整体联系减少。在 Covid-19 疫情之后,总共 45% 的接受调查的员工实际上感觉与团队的联系更加紧密(43% 的现场员工、52% 的远程员工和 46% 的混合员工)。 一些员工确实感觉联系较少(25%)。远程员工最有可能表示感觉联系较少 (34%),而现场员工 (27%) 和混合员工 (20%) 的比例较低。也有一些人没有经历任何变化。在这些受访者中,现场工作人员最有可能表示没有变化(28%)。 大多数员工每周使用数字通讯工具的时间长达 20 小时 许多员工一整天都在屏幕前度过。比例最高的受访者 (16%) 表示,他们每周在数字通信平台上花费 21 至 25 小时。平均每天大约五个小时。 15% 的人花费了 16 至 20 小时,14% 的人花费了 11 至 15 小时,12% 的人花费了 6 至 10 小时。当数字达到 31 至 35 小时时,这一数字急剧下降:只有 5% 的人表示他们在数字通信工具上花费了这么多时间。2% 的受访者每周使用数字通讯工具的时间超过 40 小时。 数字通信工具正在影响工作与生活的平衡 有了如此多的数字通信工具,越来越多的员工感受到了在正常工作时间之外与同事保持联系的压力。近 25% 的员工表示,他们总是因与同事保持联系而感到压力,而 35% 的员工表示,他们经常感到压力。而另一端——那些感觉没有压力的人——数量要少得多。7% 的人表示他们很少感到压力,而 10% 的人表示他们从不感到压力。 数字通信增加了 60% 员工的职业倦怠 无论是在家工作、在现场工作还是两者兼而有之,数字通信很可能会增加倦怠感。我们的调查显示,60% 的受访者表示数字通信增加了倦怠感。近 70% 的远程工作人员表示,他们因数字通信而感到倦怠。混合型员工和现场员工因数字通信而感到倦怠的可能性较小:分别为 56% 和 49%。 无效的沟通如何影响工作环境 只有 11% 的员工表示,无效的沟通对他们没有任何影响。对于其他受访者来说,沟通不畅极大地影响了许多地区的工人。最值得注意的是,它影响了 49% 受访者的工作效率。近 50% 的受访者表示,无效的沟通会影响工作满意度,而 42% 的受访者表示,这会影响压力水平。 沟通不畅正在影响 45% 员工的信任 对于超过 40% 的员工来说,沟通不畅会降低对领导层和团队的信任。远程工作人员受到的影响更大,54% 的人表示沟通不畅会影响对领导层的信任,52% 的人表示会影响对团队的信任。对于现场员工来说,沟通不畅并没有对信任产生同样程度的影响,尽管它仍然产生了很大的影响:43% 的人表示对领导层的信任受到了影响,38% 的人表示对团队的信任受到了影响。 工作满意度取决于大多数员工的有效沟通 受访者表示,有效的沟通影响了多个工作领域。42% 的人表示这影响了跨职能协作。工作满意度是另一个受沟通影响的重要领域:48% 的人表示他们受到了影响。近一半的受访者表示他们的生产力受到了影响。 数字通信工具正在增加工作场所的压力 对于 46% 的受访者来说,看到消息长时间被忽视会导致工作场所产生压力。45% 的受访者表示,他们的经理正在输入消息的通知给他们带来了压力。数字通信的许多其他方面也带来了压力:用正确的语气制作数字回复(42%)、破译数字消息背后的语气(38%)、领导层最后一刻的视频通话(36%)以及转向进行视频通话时关闭摄像头 (35%)。 大多数员工更喜欢电子邮件而不是其他数字通信选项 当谈到首选的沟通方式时,许多员工更喜欢老式工具。电子邮件是最受欢迎的工具,18% 的受访者将其标记为首选(25% 的远程工作人员和 10% 的现场工作人员)。视频通话是第二受欢迎的选择(17%),其次是直接消息(16%)。对于现场工作人员来说,面对面对话是迄今为止最喜欢的沟通方式,34% 的受访者表示这是他们的偏好。 不同性别的偏好相同,但在视频通话方面差异很大:22% 的男性受访者更喜欢视频,12% 的女性更喜欢视频。 年龄对沟通方式的偏好产生了影响:59 至 77 岁之间的受访者中有 40% 更喜欢面对面交谈,而 18 至 26 岁的受访者中只有 17% 的受访者喜欢面对面交谈,而 27 至 42 岁的受访者中只有 16% 的受访者更喜欢面对面交谈。 员工如何使用数字通信进行联系 对于许多员工来说,数字通信是他们日常生活的重要组成部分,但他们使用的通信方法有所不同。超过一半 (56%) 的受访者使用视频进行交流,55% 使用音频。个性化问候不太常见(44%)。表情符号和 GIF 仍然是相对常见的交流形式:分别为 42% 和 34%。 女性受访者比男性受访者更喜欢个性化问候:分别为 47% 和 40%。 男性受访者比女性受访者更喜欢音频:63% 和 50%。视频也遵循类似的模式:61%(男性)对 53%(女性)。 43 至 58 岁的受访者对 GIF 的偏好最高:42%,而 18 至 26 岁的受访者为 31%。 18 岁至 26 岁之间的受访者最有可能喜欢视频 (69%)。对视频的偏好随着年龄的增长而下降:60% 的受访者年龄在 27 岁至 42 岁之间,50% 的受访者年龄在 43 岁至 58 岁之间,只有 23% 的受访者年龄在 59 岁至 77 岁之间。 每个州有多少人仍然在家工作? Forbes Advisor 统计了 2023 年各州在家工作的总人数。调查发现,远程工作者的比例因州而异。在在家工作劳动力最多的 11 个州中,有 20% 至 24.2% 的人在家工作。 华盛顿州在家工作的人数比例最高,占在家工作劳动力的 24.2%,其次是马里兰州 (24%) 和科罗拉多州 (23.7%)。 马萨诸塞州是在家工作比例最高的州(23.7%),其次是俄勒冈州(22.7%)、弗吉尼亚州(22.3%)和新泽西州(22.1%)。 密西西比州在家工作的劳动力数量最少。在 120 万工人中,只有 6.3%(76,556 人)在家工作。 结论 自 Covid-19 以来,虽然数字通信世界发生了很大变化,但也有一些不变的事情。尽管有许多选项和工具可用,但电子邮件和电话仍然是最受欢迎的两种通信方式。VoIP 系统也越来越受欢迎,28% 的受访者使用它们。员工平均每周在数字通信平台上花费 20 小时,这是每周 40 小时工作时间的一半。 展望未来,对于团队和小型企业来说,建立高效的数字通信系统非常重要,特别是考虑到我们调查的一半以上的人表示数字通信会导致职业倦怠加剧。 如果公司或团队围绕数字通信建立健康的文化,则可能会带来更好的工作满意度、更高的生产力以及对公司领导层和团队的更高信任度。 方法 Forbes Advisor 根据市场研究协会的行为准则,委托市场研究公司 OnePoll 对 1,000 名在办公室工作的美国人进行了调查。置信度为 95% 时,误差幅度为 +/- 3.1 个点。OnePoll 研究团队是 MRS 的成员,并且是美国民意研究协会 (AAPOR) 的企业会员。 为了了解每个州在家工作的工人数量,《福布斯顾问》从人口普查局的美国社区调查中获取了数据。 https://www.forbes.com/advisor/business/digital-communication-workplace/ https://www.forbes.com/advisor/business/digital-communication-workplace/
    Productivity
    2024年02月01日
  • Productivity
    The best HR & People Analytics articles of January 2024 2024 is set to be a momentous year. With economic uncertainty, rising geopolitical conflict, and rapid advances in technology, it is also set to be a stormy 12 months for the world, for organisations, and for HR professionals too. Perhaps this explains the slew of insightful resources in January, which has made compiling this month’s collection as challenging as it has been enjoyable. One of the key focuses has been on ‘productivity’, and I’ve brought together a number of resources on this topic. There are also new studies from the likes of PwC, McKinsey, Glassdoor, Accenture, and Deloitte as well as articles featuring practitioners from companies including Spotify, Microsoft, Ericsson, Lloyds Banking Group, and Standard Chartered. There’s lots to enjoy and learn from. Join me for a webinar on February 21 to discover how Leading Companies shift People Analytics from insight to impact Are you an HR or People Analytics Leader seeking to transform your organisation’s People Analytics from mere insights to impactful business outcomes? If so, I invite you to join me for a webinar that Insight222 is hosting on February 21. Naomi Verghese and I will walk through the findings from the Insight222 People Analytics Trends research, unveiling the distinctive characteristics of ABCD Teams that propel organisations to new heights. Naomi and I will be joined by Alan Susi, VP and Global Head of Organisational Analytics and People Insights at S&P Global. Alan will share insights into how S&P Global successfully elevated their approach to people analytics, turning data into tangible business outcomes. You can register for the webinar here – or by clicking the image below. Jürgen Klopp – a study in leadership, culture, and analytics As a fervent supporter, I’m still processing the totally unexpected news that Jürgen Klopp will be leaving his post as the manager of Liverpool at the end of the current football season. In his press conference on taking the reins at Anfield in October 2015, Klopp stated his goal was to turn Liverpool from “doubters to believers.” He has done this with some aplomb amassing a haul of seven trophies (to date) including the Champions League in 2019 and then, the following year, the Holy Grail of Liverpool’s first league title in 30 years. But Klopp is more than a brilliant football manager. He is the epitome of an empathetic leader. His emotional intelligence and natural humility not only endears Klopp to his players, but to supporters too for whom he is adored. The reaction to the news reduced many Liverpool supporters to tears. I’m still hoping – probably forlornly - that like Alex Ferguson in 2002, Klopp will change his mind and stay. In the likely event that he does depart, I’m sure that multiple studies will be made on Klopp’s time at Anfield, and that his leadership skills, use of data and analytics, and ability to build an inclusive winning culture will be deservedly celebrated. YNWA. Looking for a new role in people analytics or HR tech? Before we get to this month’s collection of resources, I’d like to highlight once again the wonderful resource created by Richard Rosenow and the One Model team of open roles in people analytics and HR technology, which now numbers over 500 roles. Looking for a people analytics event to attend in 2024? Richard Rosenow has also been busy compiling a study of People Analytics Conferences to attend in 2024 with the data collected from practitioners themselves. Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP), People Analytics World and the Wharton People Analytics Conference all come out well as does the Insight222 Global Executive Retreat. Thanks to Richard for putting this together. Share the love! Enjoy reading the collection of resources for January and, if you do, please share some data driven HR love with your colleagues and networks. Thanks to the many of you who liked, shared and/or commented on December’s compendium (including those in the Comments below). If you enjoy a weekly dose of curated learning (and the Digital HR Leaders podcast), the Insight222 newsletter: Digital HR Leaders newsletter is published every Tuesday – subscribe here. THE QUEST FOR PRODUCTIVITY MCKINSEY - 2024 and beyond: Will it be economic stagnation or the advent of productivity-driven abundance? | PwC - 27th Annual Global CEO Survey: Thriving in an age of continuous reinvention | JOSH BERSIN - HR Predictions for 2024: The Global Search For Productivity | ERIK BRYNJOLFSSON - How AI Will Transform Productivity | BEN WABER AND NATHANAEL J. FAST - Is GenAI’s Impact on Productivity Overblown? When I talk with CHROs and People Analytics Leaders at the companies we work with at Insight222, one of the words I’m hearing most at the moment is ‘productivity’. Continuing economic and geopolitical uncertainty, the promise of AI, and challenging talent demographics are all fuelling the demand for productivity from CEOs. Here are five resources that can be filed under the ‘productivity’ umbrella: (1) McKinsey’s Ezra Greenberg, Asutosh Padhi, and Sven Smit present a model for businesses to capture the three-sided productivity opportunity (see FIG 1). (2) Amongst a ton of takeaways, the standout theme from the annual PwC CEO survey is that the vast majority of participating companies are already taking some steps towards reinvention, while CEOs believe that 40% of their work is wasted productivity (see FIG 2). (3) Josh Bersin draws from the PwC survey in his 2024 predictions, where he outlines The Productivity Advantage where “If you can help your company move faster (productivity implies speed, not only profit), you can reinvent faster than your competition.” (4) Stanford professor Erik Brynjolfsson offers leaders an overview of how AI will transform productivity. (5) Finally, Ben Waber and Nathanael Fast’s absorbing essay in Harvard Business Review cautions leaders on leaning into the hype on GAI’s supposed positive impact on productivity too heavily. The authors break down two of the key challenges with LLMs: a) their persistent ability to produce convincing falsities and b) the likely long-term negative effects of using LLMs on employees and internal processes. FIG 1: The three-side productivity opportunity (Source: McKinsey) FIG 2: CEOs estimate administrative inefficiency at 40% (Source: PwC) GERGELY OROSZ AND ABI NODA - Measuring Developer Productivity: Real-World Examples Continuing the productivity theme, this is an invaluable resource by Gergely Orosz and Abi Noda in The Pragmatic Engineer newsletter. It provides detail on developer productivity metrics at 17 tech companies including Google, Microsoft, Spotify, and Uber (see summary in FIG 3). FIG 3: Developer productivity metrics at 17 tech companies (Source: Pragmatic Engineer) 2024 HR TRENDS AND PREDICTIONS JASMINE PANAYIDES - Nine Ways to Put HR Trends and Predictions into Practice in 2024 There has been a flood of articles advising what the key HR trends, predictions, and opportunities for 2024 are, but how are HR professionals supposed to make sense of these? In her article for the myHRfuture blog, Jasmine Panayides provides actionable tips on how HR professionals can apply the trends, predictions and opportunities to their work, and their organisations so they can deliver value to the company and the workforce. Jasmine also helpfully summarises the trends/predictions from a variety of sources into one table (see FIG 4), including from: Visier Inc., Gartner, Bernard Marr, UNLEASH, Mercer, and Culture Amp as well as my own 12 Opportunities for HR in 2024 article. FIG 4: Analysis of HR Trends and Predictions for 2024 (Source: myHRfuture) KATARINA BERG - HR Trends for 2024 | GARTNER - 9 Future of Work Trends for 2024 | GLASSDOOR – 2024 Workforce Trends | HUNG LEE - Forecasting 2024 in Recruitment Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4 | KEVIN WHEELER - What Does 2024 Hold in Store for Us? | STACIA GARR AND DANI JOHNSON – 2024 Mega Trends and how people leaders should respond (Webinar) The deluge of commentators offering their HR trends and opportunities continued in January. As such, it is a challenge to sort the wheat from the chaff but in addition to those I highlighted in this compendium in December, and in Jasmine’s article above, I recommend diving into the following: (1) Spotify’s chief people officer, Katarina Berg, highlights ten trends with the common theme being each trend is a bridge, connecting the past with the future, and HR professionals are the architects crafting these vital links – including “Staying Human in the Age of AI – The Humanity Bridge”. (2) Gartner’s Jordan Turner and Emily Rose McRae highlight nine future of work trends for the year ahead (see FIG 5). (3) Aaron Terrazas and Daniel Zhao identify eight workforce trends based on Glassdoor’s data on workplace satisfaction, culture, and conversations. (4) Hung Lee is at the cutting edge of recruiting and HR tech, so his four-part series on recruiting in 2024 is definitely worth checking out – two examples include: “Multi-generational replaces neurodiversity as DEIB hot topic” and “Capital Allocation Shifts from Sourcing & Engagement to Assessment & Verification Tech”. (5) Futurist Kevin Wheeler offers seven insights and predictions together with his self-assessed certainty rating including “Generative AI will dominate, and every product will attempt to incorporate AI. 90% certainty” and “More firms will embrace a four-day workweek 50% certainty”. (6) Finally, I strongly recommend viewing the 2024 Mega Trends webinar hosted by Stacia Sherman Garr and Dani Johnson for RedThread Research, which breaks down the key macro factors impacting the world of work and how HR can respond. FIG 5: 9 Future of Work Trends for 2024 (Source: Gartner) GREG NEWMAN - 10 important topics that HR will likely ignore in 2024 Greg Newman takes an alternative, wry and contrarian approach by focusing his list of “predictions” on ten things most HR teams will continue to ignore in 2024. My favourite three are: (1) speaking the language of the business, (2) focusing AI conversations on ethics before technology, and (3) learning that good data is required to realise the dreams of AI and analytics. By aligning HR language with business terminology, we can more effectively demonstrate the value of our initiatives in a way that resonates with business stakeholders. GENERATIVE AI AND THE FUTURE OF WORK ELLYN SHOOK AND PAUL DAUGHERTY - Work, workforce, workers: Reinvented in the age of generative AI A new study from Accenture, co-authored by Ellyn Shook and Paul Daugherty, on how generative AI is impacting work, provides guidance on how leaders can: “Set and guide a vision to reinvent work, reshape the workforce and prepare workers for a generative AI world, while building a resilient culture to navigate continuous waves of change.” The report reveals a trust gap between workers and leaders on key elements related to GAI’s impact on work, the workforce, and workers. The authors also highlight four accelerators for leaders to navigate the journey ahead: (1) Lead and learn in new ways, (2) Reinvent work, (3) Reshape the workforce (see example in FIG 6), and (4) Prepare workers. FIG 6: Illustrative example of how work and roles can be reallocated in a GAI future (Source: Accenture) ROGER W. HOERL AND THOMAS C. REDMAN - What Managers Should Ask About AI Models and Data Sets The decision on whether to deploy AI models within an organisation ultimately lies with business leaders who may not be qualified to identify risks and weaknesses related to AI models and data sets. In their article, Roger Hoerl and Tom Redman provide (1) A framework (see FIG 7) designed to equip leaders with context and based on their concept of the right data. (2) A set of six questions for leaders to ask their AI model developers before and during modelling work and deployment. (3) Guidance for leaders on how to assess AI model developers’ answers to those six questions. FIG 7: The Right Data Framework (Source: Roger W. Hoerl and Thomas C. Redman) PEOPLE ANALYTICS STEVE HATFIELD, SUE CANTRELL, AND BRAD KREIT - Beyond the quick fix: How workforce data can drive deeper organizational problem-solving The premise of this thoughtful article by Steve Hatfield, Susan Cantrell, and Brad Kreit is that without the right context, even simple measurements can undermine efforts to convert people data into value. They then explore several examples – in the workforce, in the workplace, and in the work – where organisations might be limiting their analysis to the surface level and how deeper analysis can reveal systemic issues that lead to opportunities for transformation. Guidance on three actions leaders can take to help ensure they are not missing important context in their data analysis are provided: (1) Bring data from different domains and sources together for analysis. (2) Make sure you’re measuring what you should—not just what you can. (3) Identify potential biases in data collection algorithms. If organizations want to move beyond quick fixes and use work and workforce data to drive deeper—and often more challenging—problem-solving, it is important that they look at the data in context. NAOMI VERGHESE - How to Measure the Value of People Analytics My Insight222 colleague Naomi Verghese digs how to measure the commercial value of people analytics, highlighting a powerful case study from Jaesun HA and LG Electronics. Naomi provides detail on four key areas where people analytics adds value (business performance, workforce experiences, driving an analytics culture and societal benefit) as well as providing data on the characteristics of companies that ARE creating commercial value from people analytics (see FIG 8). FIG 8: Characteristics of people analytics that disclosed and measured commercial value of people analytics solutions (Source: Insight222 People Analytics Trends, 2023) ANDRÉS GARCIA AYALA - 5 Change Drivers Impacting People Analytics & How To Thrive In Them | WILLIS JENSEN - Attrition versus Retention: Which Should I Use? | KEITH McNULTY – Regression Modeling in People Analytics: Survival Analysis | LYDIA WU - The Market Sucks and You are Looking for a Job, Now What? | SEBASTIAN SZACHNOWSKI - 16 HR Metrics for IT | ERIN FLEMING AND NICK JESTEADT - People Analytics Perspectives from the Fringe: Current Priorities and a View on Optimized Teams in 2024 January saw a slew of articles from current and recent people analytics leaders, which typically act as a spur and inspiration for the field. Six are highlighted here: (1) Andrés García Ayala highlights some of the key change drivers impacting people analytics and ways to incorporate them into our work. (2) Willis Jensen builds on the recent primer on attrition metrics by Ben Teusch that I highlighted in December’s edition. He explains why we should be using attrition and retention as separate terms that lead to distinct metrics with different objectives (see also FIG 9). (3) Keith McNulty provides another indispensable practical guide for people analysts with a step-by-step tutorial to conducting survival analysis in R. (4) The prolific Lydia Wu turns her attention to providing some handy guidance for those looking for their next people analytics / HR tech role. (5) Sebastian Szachnowski provides a useful breakdown of 16 HR metrics for technology companies. (6) Last but definitely not least, Erin Fleming and Nick Jesteadt provide insights from their survey of fellow people analytics practitioners. Insights include a) 41% of respondents (n=49) operate as a one-person people analytics team, and ii) the main current focus areas of work include employee turnover, cultural engagement, return to office, and restructuring. FIG 9: When to use Attrition and Retention (Source: Willis Jensen) MAX BLUMBERG - The Big List of GPTs to Revolutionize Your People Processes | JOHANNES SUNDLO - GenAI for People Analytics Two articles addressing the opportunity for generative AI in the people space. (1) Max Blumberg (JA) ?? sets out 93 potential ways to upgrade your People Processes with AI and GPTs across four categories – workforce planning and strategy, recruitment, learning and development, and employee wellbeing. (2) Johannes Sundlo provides examples of companies using GAI in their people analytics work to support analyses on engagement data, skills, and tailoring training recommendations. GPTs are an amazing tool for scenario planning, forecasting future workforce needs, identifying talent gaps, and developing integrated talent strategies. THE EVOLUTION OF HR AND DATA DRIVEN CULTURE DAVE ULRICH, NORM SMALLWOOD, AND JOE GROCHOWSKI - Why and How to Move HR to an Outside-In Approach When asked the question, “What is the biggest challenge in your job today?” HR professionals will typically provide answers such as: “Build a skills-based organisation” or “Help our employees have a better experience”. As Dave Ulrich, Norm Smallwood, and Joe Grochowski write, these answers would be far more powerful when a “so that” is applied e.g. “Help employees have a better experience so that customer experience improves.” The article demonstrates that greater value is created with an outside-in approach that starts with the needs of external stakeholders (customers, investors, community) and then figuring out the implications inside the company for meeting those needs. Dave, Norm, and Joe also present their Human Capability Framework and a tool that provides an assessment of an organisation’s outside-in performance (see FIG 10). FIG 10: Human capability from the outside-in - diagnostic questions (Source: Dave Ulrich et al) WORKFORCE PLANNING, ORG DESIGN, AND SKILLS-BASED ORGANISATIONS AMY WEBB - Bringing True Strategic Foresight Back to Business In her article for Harvard Business Review, Amy Webb defines strategic foresight as “a disciplined and systematic approach to identify where to play, how to win in the future, and how to ensure organizational resiliency in the face of unforeseen disruption.” Her article also advocates for the integration of strategic foresight as a core competency in every organisation, regardless of size. Moreover, Amy provides guidance on how to operationalise strategic foresight by unveiling a ten-step process. Read alongside another article authored by Amy for HBR: How to Do Strategic Planning Like a Futurist, which includes Amy’s Futurist’s Framework for Strategic Planning (see FIG 11). FIG 11: A Futurist’s Framework for Strategic Planning (Source: Amy Webb) WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM AND PwC - Putting Skills First: Opportunities for Building Efficient and Equitable Labour Markets As the introduction to this compelling collaboration between the World Economic Forum and PwC begins: “Skills and talent shortages are critical challenges facing societies and economies today. The absence of relevant skills impedes business growth, hinders economic prosperity, and inhibits individuals from realizing their full potential.” The report identifies five specific opportunities for intervention where the gains from skills-first solutions are most likely for employers and workers alike (see ‘Skills-first Framework’ in FIG 12). Additionally, the report also showcases 13 Skills First “Lighthouses”, including IBM, Siemens, Standard Chartered and Sanofi. It concludes by offering key takeaways regarding six success factors in implementing skills-first approaches including (1) Sponsorship from leadership, (2) Alignment with business needs, and (3) Data and evaluation for iteration. (Authors: Genesis Elhussein, Mark Rayner, Aarushi Singhania, Saadia Zahidi, Peter Brown MBE, Miral Mir, and Bhushan Sethi). A cultural shift to skills-first approaches needs both sponsorship from executives and governance from human-resources professionals FIG 12: Skills-first Framework (Source: World Economic Forum PETER SHEPPARD - Learning from our Skills Journey | BEN AUTY - What are the new skills people will need for the future of work? | TANUJ KAPILASHRAMI - How Standard Chartered is Unlocking the Power of Skills in the Workplace Many of the organisations we work with at Insight222 have embarked on the road to becoming a skills-based organisation. It is not an easy journey, so it is helpful to learn from other companies who are treading this path. Three of these are Ericsson, Lloyds Banking Group, and Standard Chartered. (1) In his article, Peter Sheppard shares learnings from Ericsson’s skills journey including a) it’s not jobs or skills; it’s skills and jobs, b) it’s a whole organisation activity, c) Less is more with skills, and d) Data drives value. (2) Ben Auty shares insights as to why Lloyds Banking Group is developing a learning culture to build the workforce of the future at the bank, the main skills they are focusing on, and the central role the recently established Reskilling Team is playing. (3) Tanuj Kapilashrami shares how Standard Chartered catalysed their work on skills by identifying adjacencies between ‘sunset’ and ‘sunrise’ roles. We looked at skills adjacencies between ‘sunset’ jobs and ‘sunrise’ jobs: so, what are the jobs that are going to go away? What are the skills that help employees get reskilled into some of these sunrise jobs? We ran five proofs of concept, we showed some real redeployment opportunities and started making the skills narrative real. EMPLOYEE LISTENING, EMPLOYEE EXPERIENCE, AND EMPLOYEE WELLBEING JENNIFER E. SIGLER WITH STEPHANIE DENINO - So Many Stakeholders, So Little Time: State of EX 2023-2024 The fifth annual State of EX study authored by Jennifer E. Sigler, PhD on behalf of The EXchange, Inc, TI PEOPLE and FOUNT Global, Inc. is a treasure chest of insights on the fast-evolving practice of employee experience. It highlights the top four priorities for EX as: (1) Redesigning experiences, (2) Getting broader buy-in for EX work across the organisation, (3) Building an EX roadmap for the organisation, and (4) Getting more / better data. One other standout finding from the study suggests that senior leaders are increasingly focused on EX with a majority of respondents (63%) saying their organisation’s senior leaders view EX as equal to or even more important than other corporate priorities. This bodes well for the future of EX. Thanks to Stephanie Denino and Volker Jacobs for highlighting the study. FIG 13: EX Team Priorities YOY Change (Source: The EXchange, TI People and FOUNT Global, Inc) LEADERSHIP AND CULTURE NADJIA YOUSIF, ASHLEY DARTNELL, GRETCHEN MAY, AND ELIZABETH KNARR - Psychological Safety Levels the Playing Field for Employees | PETER CAPPELLI AND LIAT ELDOR - Can Workplaces Have Too Much Psychological Safety? Two perspectives on psychological safety in the workplace. In the first article, Nadjia Yousif, Ashley Dartnell, Gretchen May, and Elizabeth Knarr present the findings of Boston Consulting Group (BCG) research, which finds how psychological safety benefits inclusion, reduces attrition in diverse groups and effectively acts as an equaliser - enabling diverse and disadvantaged employee groups to achieve the same levels of workplace satisfaction as their more advantaged colleagues. The study also highlights the direct relationship between empathetic leadership and feelings of psychological safety in the workforce, giving leaders a clear directive to be empathetic and thereby engender psychological safety. The second article by Peter Cappelli and Liat Eldor presents research that found that when you move from average to high levels of psychological safety, performance in routine jobs actually declined. FIG 14: Psychological safety has an outsize impact on retention for diversity groups (Source: BCG) RASMUS HOUGAARD, JACQUELINE CARTER, AND ROB STEMBRIDGE - The Best Leaders Can’t Be Replaced by AI While there are some areas where AI is already surpassing or will surpass human capabilities, there are several it cannot replace. Based on their research into employees’ comfort with AI in management, as well as their decades of research on the qualities of effective leadership, Rasmus Hougaard, Jacqueline Carter, and Robert Stembridge identify the promise (and perils) of AI-enabled management (see FIG 15), as well as the three uniquely human capabilities leaders need to focus on honing, especially as AI begins to figure more in management: (1) awareness, (2) compassion, and (3) wisdom. For more from Rasmus, I recommend listening to his podcast discussion with me: How To Be a More Compassionate Leader. Leaders who deepen their ability to lead with humanity will win at attracting, retaining, developing, and motivating top talent. FIG 15: AI versus Human: A matric of leadership activities (Source: Potential Project) DIVERSITY, EQUITY, INCLUSION, AND BELONGING JULIE COFFMAN, ALEX NOETHER, BIANCA BAX, CASSY REICHERT, AND KRYSTLE JIANG - The Business of Belonging: Why making everyone feel included is smart strategy Revealing data from a Bain survey of 6,000+ employees across four countries, which finds employees who have seen their companies intentionally invest in inclusion since 2020 are three times more likely to feel fully included than employees who have not seen such investment from their employers. Other findings include (1) Combining diversity and inclusion maximises a company’s capacity (by 4x) to innovate, and (2) Employees with inclusive leadership are 9x more likely to feel fully included at work (see FIG 16). (Authors: Julie Coffman, Alex Noether, Bianca Bax, Cassy Reichert, and Krystle Jiang). FIG 16: Employees with inclusive leadership are 9x more likely to feel fully included at work (Source: Bain) SHUJAAT AHMAD - DEIB Is At A Crossroads—It’s Time for Bold Action and Clear Metrics Given recent developments it’s reasonable to say that Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging (DEIB) is at an existential crossroads. As Shujaat Ahmad writes in his excellent article for Round: “Boards, leadership teams, and investors hold the power to set the tone, shape the policies, and allocate the resources to support DEIB initiatives: for DEIB to work effectively, they must shift from well-intentioned wordsmiths to committed drivers that hold the organization accountable for outcomes and positive change.” Shujaat then unveils his blueprint to help leaders assess progress and drive meaningful change, clarifying the ‘why’ before diving into the ‘how’ covering measuring what matters and interventions (see FIG 17). For more from Shujaat, I recommend visiting Belong and Lead. FIG 17: Source – Shujaat Ahmad HR TECH VOICES Much of the innovation in the field continues to be driven by the vendor community, and I’ve picked out a few resources from January that I recommend readers delve into: ERNEST NG - If the Pitch is Too Smooth, It Probably Is: Why AI in HR is Difficult – Part 2 of an insightful essay from Ernest Ng, PhD of HiredScore (see also Part 1 on disclosures here) where he cuts through the hype to assess how we should be implementing AI in HR. LOUJAINA ABDELWAHED - A Tale of Two Cultures - In One Company - Loujaina Abdelwahed, PhD from Revelio Labs highlights the growing disparity between junior and senior employees (see FIG 18) and identifies the factors causing this malaise. Thanks to Ben Zweig for highlighting. FIG 18: The growing disparity in sentiment between junior and senior employees (Source: Revelio Labs) JEREMIE BRECHEISEN - Where Employees Think Companies’ DEIB Efforts Are Failing – Jeremie K Brecheisen presents findings from Gallup that reveals a disconnect between how well employees and HR leaders believe their organisations are doing when it comes to diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging: 84% of CHROs say their organisations are increasing investment in DEIB, while only 31% of employees say their organisation is committed to improving racial justice or equity in their workplace (see FIG 19). The article then outlines ten needs employees say are not being met and then offers strategies to help organisations address the disconnect. FIG 19: How employees and HR leaders differ on perceptions of DEIB progress (Source: Gallup) FRANCISCO MARIN - Navigating the ONA Landscape: Trends and Challenges for 2024 - Another good read from Cognitive Talent Solutions, as Francisco Marin explores the key trends and challenges shaping the ONA space in 2024. IAN WHITE - The three C’s of effective performance management – Ian White, CEO at ChartHop, presents the three C’s of performance management — continuous, contextual and cultural — designed to help companies understand their employees more holistically. CHRISTINA JANZER - The surprising connection between after-hours work and decreased productivity – Christina Janzer presents findings from Slack’s Workforce Index, which identifies findings on how to structure the workday to maximise employee productivity, well-being and satisfaction – including the connection between after hours work and decreased productivity. FIG 20: Source – Slack PODCASTS OF THE MONTH In another month of high-quality podcasts, I’ve selected five gems for your aural pleasure: (you can also check out the latest episodes of the Digital HR Leaders Podcast – see ‘From My Desk’ below): AMY EDMONDSON AND LAURIE RUETTIMANN – Right Kind of Failure – Amy Edmondson joins Laurie Ruettimann on the brilliantly named Punk Rock HR to explore the essential role of failure in our professional and personal growth. STACIA GARR, COLE NAPPER, AND SCOTT HINES - People Analytics & HR Tech Research by Industry Analysts – Stacia Sherman Garr, one of the industry’s top analysts, joins Cole Napper and Scott Hines, PhD on the Directionally Correct podcast to discuss the research Stacia and her team at RedThread Research do in the people analytics and HR technology space. RICHARD ROSENOW, MADDIE GRANT, AND SANJA LICINA - How to Build an Integrated Framework for Workforce Listening – In an episode of the Empowering Workplaces podcast, Richard Rosenow joins hosts Maddie Grant and Sanja Licina, Ph.D. to talk about The Three Channels of Workforce Information: conversations (“what people say”), surveys (“what people say they do”) and systems (“what people do”) as a way to build a comprehensive understanding of your workforce. McKINSEY - The shape of talent in 2023 and 2024 - In this episode of McKinsey Talks Talent, Bryan Hancock, Brooke Weddle and host Lucia Rahilly highlight the trends that shaped last year’s talent landscape—and those poised to ‘redefine its contours’ yet again in 2024. MATTHEW BIDWELL AND DAN LONEY – Forecasting 2024 Workplace Trends – Wharton Professor and convenor of the Wharton People Analytics Conference, Matthew Bidwell, joins host of the Wharton Business Daily Dan Loney to look at the year ahead in the workplace. VIDEO OF THE MONTH CHRIS LOUIE, TOMAS CHAMORRO-PREMUZIC, TERRI HORTON, AND LINDSEY SHINTANI - Power a dynamic workforce by embracing AI An enlightening panel discussion from the recent LinkedIn Talent Connect where Chris Louie, Dr Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic, Terri Horton, EdD, MBA, MA, SHRM-CP, PHR, and Lindsey Shintani discuss how AI is changing learning and career paths. They provide guidance on how to overcome AI anxiety and empower impactful futures. BOOK OF THE MONTH KEVIN WHEELER AND BAS VAN DE HATERD – Talent Acquisition Excellence An excellent new book published by Kogan Page and authored by Kevin Wheeler and Bas van de Haterd (He/His/Him). It provides an insightful and detailed analysis of how technologies such as artificial intelligence and machine learning in combination with analytics can improve talent acquisition and recruitment. RESEARCH REPORT OF THE MONTH YUYE DING AND MARK (SHUAI) MA - Return-to-Office Mandates A huge thank you to Nick Bloom for bringing my attention to this paper from Yuye Ding and Mark Ma, which studied the impact of 137 Return to Office mandates on the performance of S&P500 firms from 2020-2023. The key findings, as summarised by Nick, are illuminating: (1) RTO mandates are more likely in firms with poor recent stock performance, and in those with powerful male CEOs. (2) Glassdoor data finds RTO mandates significantly reduce employee ratings for job satisfaction, work-life balance, and senior management. (3) There is no significant impact of RTO mandates on either firm profitability or firm stock-returns. FIG 21: Distribution of firms’ RTO mandates (Source: Yuye Ding and Mark Ma) FROM MY DESK January saw the first three episodes of Series 36 of the Digital HR Leaders podcast, sponsored by our friends at ScreenCloud. Thank you to Luke Farrugia. DAVID GREEN - The best 60 HR & People Analytics articles of 2023 Part 1 | Part 2 – My tenth annual collection of HR and people analytics resources is spread across two articles and ten themes. Part 1 covers i) the future of work and people strategy, ii) workplace design and strategy, iii) AI and the world of work, iv) people analytics, and v) employee experience, listening and wellbeing. Part 2 covers: vi) the evolution of HR, HR operating models and the CHRO, vii) building a data driven culture in HR, viii) workforce planning, skills, and talent marketplace, ix) leadership and culture, and x) diversity, equity, inclusion and belonging. THOMAS RASMUSSEN, DAWN KLINGHOFFER, AND JEREMY SHAPIRO - HR in 2024: The Impact of People Analytics, AI & ML – In a special episode of the Digital HR Leaders podcast to kick off 2024, I was joined by Thomas Rasmussen, Dawn Klinghoffer, and Jeremy Shapiro to discuss the outlook for HR and people analytics in the coming 12 months. SERENA HUANG - How to Enhance Your Career in People Analytics - Serena H. Huang, Ph.D., who has led people analytics functions at companies including GE, PayPal and Kraft Heinz, joins me to discuss the common career paths observed in the people analytics field and how they have evolved over the years. KAZ HASSAN AND LUKE FARUGGIA - How to Bridge the Gap Between Customer and Employee Experience - What can HR learn from marketing's journey in using data, analytics and technology to understand and personalise the customer experience? How can we leverage these insights in HR to boost our employee experience initiatives? Kaz Hassan and Luke Faruggia join me to discuss these topics and more. THANK YOU Finally, this month I’d like to thank: Recruit CRM for nominating me as ‘The People Analytics Pioneer’ in their list of 50 Recruitment Influencers to Follow in 2024 Likewise, a huge thank you to 365Talents for including me as one of the Top 50 HR Influencers to Follow in 2024 Similarly, thanks to HRCap, Inc. for including me in their list of 10 HR Influencers who Provide Remarkable Insights The Social Craft (here) and The Talent Games (here) for also including me in their lists of HR and HR Tech leaders to follow. HRDConnect for quoting me in their article Data Literacy: A must-have for HR professionals in 2024. Gianni Giacomelli for including the Data Driven HR monthly in his list of seven must-read newsletters. HR Geckos for including Excellence in People Analytics as a book recommendation in their HR Bytes Newsletter for January 2024. Sebastian Szachnowski for including Excellence in People Analytics in his list of books to get better at people analytics. Leapsome for including the Digital HR Leaders podcast as one of its Top 10 HR Podcasts for 2024. Similarly, Alexandre Darbois for also including the Digital HR Leaders podcast as one of his 5 HR Podcasts. Melissa Meredith for using my 12 Opportunities for HR in 2024 article to highlight the importance of the HR-Finance partnership in building a thriving company. Bill Brown for also highlighting my 12 Opportunities for HR in 2024 article in his Eleven Trends Transforming the Future of Work in 2024. Mirro.io for including me as a contributor in their list of 15 HR Trends for 2024. Dhanesh K for including as one of his 10 Top HR Leaders to Follow. Lanteria HR for recommending me as one of their HR Experts to Follow in 2024. Semos Cloud for including my 12 Opportunities for HR in 2024 as part of their round-up of HR insights. Thomas Kohler for including my Best HR and People Analytics Articles of 2023 in their collection of HR resources to read. Thinkers360 for including me in their Top Voices EMEA 2023. ABOUT THE AUTHOR David Green ?? is a globally respected author, speaker, conference chair, and executive consultant on people analytics, data-driven HR and the future of work. As Managing Partner and Executive Director at Insight222, he has overall responsibility for the delivery of the Insight222 People Analytics Program, which supports the advancement of people analytics in over 90 global organisations. Prior to co-founding Insight222, David accumulated over 20 years experience in the human resources and people analytics fields, including as Global Director of People Analytics Solutions at IBM. As such, David has extensive experience in helping organisations increase value, impact and focus from the wise and ethical use of people analytics. David also hosts the Digital HR Leaders Podcast and is an instructor for Insight222's myHRfuture Academy. His book, co-authored with Jonathan Ferrar, Excellence in People Analytics: How to use Workforce Data to Create Business Value was published in the summer of 2021. SEE ME AT THESE EVENTS I'll be speaking about people analytics, the future of work, and data driven HR at a number of upcoming events in 2024: Feb 21 - Discover how Leading Companies shift People Analytics from insight to impact (Webinar) Feb 28 - People Analytics World 2024: Exploring the Potential of Analytics and AI in Employee Experience (Zurich) March 4-6 - Gloat Live! (New York) March 14-15 - Wharton People Analytics Conference (Philadelphia) April 24-25 - People Analytics World (London) May 7-9 - UNLEASH America (Las Vegas) September 24-26 - Insight222 Global Executive Retreat (Colorado, US) - exclusively for member organisations of the Insight222 People Analytics Program October 16-17 - UNLEASH World (Paris) More events will be added as they are confirmed.
    Productivity
    2024年02月01日
  • Productivity
    改善居家办公问责制的7个方法 受漫长的疫情影响以及网络通讯日益方便迅捷,居家办公了越来越合理化。居家办公成为职场大势,而管理者通常认为居家办公会严重影响员工工作效率。事实上,与其一味心里过滤不如正视其好处,适应混合式和多元化工作。 想了解居家办公问责制,就要知道是居家办公问责制的什么,其好处是什么,以及七个改善团队或企业问责制的方法。 居家办公(WFH)是许多美国专业人士的新型常态,无论是全职的远程工作还是混合式工作。然而,这种工作制度给企业和员工带来许多利益的同时也带来了特别的挑战——尤其是问责制的问题。没有了传统的办公环境,办公效率以及办公可靠度就需要刻意努力和有效的策略来维持。 在这篇文章中,我们将探讨如何改善居家办公的问责制,让个人和团队在这种新的工作环境下蓬勃发展。 What is work-from-home accountability? 什么是居家办公问责制? Accountability is taking ownership of one’s actions, decisions and outcomes in the remote work context. This means being responsible for meeting deadlines, maintaining quality levels and honoring commitments made to colleagues and stakeholders. When working from home, it’s important to establish clear expectations and guidelines for accountability. This includes: Defining specific goals and objectives Setting realistic deadlines Providing regular feedback Giving support Accountability in remote work also requires effective communication. Inform all team members about progress, challenges and any changes that may affect the workflow. This promotes transparency and allows for better collaboration and problem-solving among teams. Benefits of work-from-home accountability 居家办公问责制的好处 To enhance accountability in remote work, it’s important to recognize its significance. Some of the benefits of focusing on accountability in remote workers include: Improved responsibility: When people hold themselves accountable for their work, they’re more likely to step up and take responsibility for the outcome of their tasks. This also gives employees a sense of accomplishment and improves job satisfaction. More transparency: When you set clear expectations for remote teams, it’s easier for them to be clear about what they’re working on and when they may need help. This also increases trust among team members. Improved collaboration: Remote team accountability helps employees collaborate by outlining who’s responsible for what, so they know who to communicate with to ensure work is completed. Fewer missed deadlines: When working remotely, it’s easy to let deadlines slide past without colleagues reminding you when work is due. Improving accountability among WFH team members helps reduce the number of missed deadlines and streamlines workflows. Better work-life balance: Accountability also improves work-life balance for employees by making sure no team members have to pick up the slack for others. 7 ways to improve work-from-home accountability 改善居家办公问责制的7个方法 Leaders and managers can establish and improve WFH accountability through a few methods. Every organization is different, so you’ll need to find what works best for your situation. 1. Set a clear WFH policy 建立明确的WFH政策 The first step in establishing WFH accountability is to have a clear policy in place. It’s a good idea to ensure team members have buy-in so they don’t feel that they can’t follow the rules. Some items your policy should cover should include expected working hours, hybrid schedules and technology usage policies. Some virtual teams may work on their own schedules and timelines while others will need to have set hours in place to ensure collaboration. Many virtual teams will need more structure than others. It’s important your policy encompasses the best system for your entire organization. Work with your managers and team leaders to find out what policies will work best for everyone. 2. Clarify responsibilities 明确职责 If employees know what’s expected of them, they’ll be more likely to hold themselves accountable to those expectations. Make sure you set clear goals, deadlines and benchmarks so employees can hold themselves to them. Workers need to know what they’re responsible for and who to ask if a project is running late or they need more help. Key performance indicators (KPIs) help teams measure the quality and efficiency of their work to make changes where needed. This is particularly important in a remote work environment where team members don’t have regular physical interactions with each other. 3. Provide the right tools 提供合适的工具 Remote employees may need additional technology and tools to communicate, collaborate and complete tasks. Make sure you provide your teams with the right technology to help them meet goals and stay on track. Virtual teams will need the right communication tool for team meetings, plus project management and collaboration tools to keep each other accountable in real time. Time management and tracking tools help teams determine how to assign project deadlines and prioritize as well. Cloud-based systems help employees work from anywhere and at any time, helping them complete projects when working from home or traveling. Leadership also needs specialized software like ActivTrak to maintain visibility and manage hybrid and remote workforces. 4. Encourage clear communication 鼓励清晰的交流 The best-performing virtual teams are those who can communicate regularly and clearly about their work. Many of the tools you provide your team members will help them communicate about work status, bottlenecks and processes. However, you should also encourage communication among teams through other means, such as weekly newsletters and quarterly all-staff meetings. Just make sure that you’re not scheduling unnecessary meetings for your team’s needs. 5. Give regular check-ins 日常打卡 Beyond clear communication about the team or organization as a whole, structured check-ins for individual employees helps ensure work-from-home policies are working for each person. Give employees a chance to voice their concerns with existing policies or let their managers know where they may be struggling. This also provides an opportunity for managers to help employees see where they’re hitting goals or where they may need to work harder. WFH environments may change over time as your team members and their needs change, so flexibility and regular feedback are key. 6. Measure productivity 衡量工作效率 Remote employee management requires understanding how your teams work best and what blockers may keep them from productivity. One way to make sure you’re setting realistic goals and that team members are accountable for their work when they work from home is to monitor productivity. There are many benefits to using WFH productivity tracking software like ActivTrak, including helping team members with time management, task management and accountability. It also gives your leaders insight to make decisions driven by data rather than guesswork, so you can see where workflows and processes may need tweaking or what’s working for your remote teams. You can also see if team members may be working too much or too little and redistribute the workload as needed. 7. Reward employees for achievements 员工成就奖励 Create a culture of engagement by rewarding employees for being accountable and meeting (or exceeding) expectations. Bonuses, extra paid time off or gifts can be special rewards, but even publicly praising employees for their contributions can go a long way toward improving accountability in your team. Other rewards can include new opportunities to further their careers or take on new challenges. Different teams and employees will have different needs for feeling valued and rewarded, so let your managers find the best way to let employees know they’re appreciated. Use ActivTrak to improve work-from-home accountability If you’re ready to take the next step to enhance work-from-home accountability for your team, ActivTrak offers a comprehensive workforce analytics platform customizable to your needs. Get insights to assess and improve employee productivity and well-being and gain visibility into how work gets done within your company. Use data to inform key decisions and optimize outcomes for your remote or hybrid teams. To see how ActivTrak can empower your team, contact our sales team for a free demo. SOURCE ActivTrak
    Productivity
    2024年01月22日
  • Productivity
    HR Predictions for 2024: The Global Search For Productivity 2024年的HR预测强调了生产力和AI在商业和雇佣实践中的关键作用。这篇文章讨论了公司在动态的经济条件和不断变化的劳动力市场背景下,如何适应他们的人才管理和招聘策略。强调了员工赋权的增加,劳动力市场的变化,以及技能发展的重要性。文章还探讨了劳动力囤积、混合工作模式和员工激活等关键概念。此外,还涉及领导力挑战、薪酬公平、DEI计划,以及可能的四天工作周。 一起来看Josh Bersin 带来新得见解 For the last two decades I’ve written about HR predictions, but this year is different. I see a year of shattering paradigms, changing every role in business. Not only will AI change every company and every job, but companies will embark on a relentless search for productivity. Think about where we have been. Following the 2008 financial crisis the world embarked on a zero-interest rate period of accelerating growth. Companies grew revenues, hired people, and watched their stock prices go up. Hiring continued at a fevered pace, leading to a record-breaking low unemployment rate of 3.5% at the end of 2019. Along came the pandemic, and within six months everything ground to a halt. Unemployment shot up to 15% in April of 2020, companies sent people home, and we re-engineered our products, services, and economy to deal with remote work, hybrid work arrangements, and a focus on mental health. Once the economy started up again (thanks to fiscal stimulus in the US), companies went back to the old cycle of hiring. But as interest rates rose and demand fell short we saw layoffs repeat, and over the last 18 months we’ve seen hiring, layoffs, and then hiring again to recover. Why the seesaw effect? CEOs and CFOs are operating in what we call the “Industrial Age” – hire to grow, then lay people off when things slow down. Well today, as we enter 2024, all that is different. We have to “hoard our talent,” invest in productivity, and redevelop and redeploy people for growth. We live in a world of 3.8% unemployment rate, labor shortages in almost every role, an increasingly empowered workforce, and a steady drumbeat of employee demands: demands for pay raises, flexibility, autonomy, and benefits. More than 20% of all US employees change jobs each year (2.3% per month), and almost half these changes are into new industries. Why is this the “new normal?” There are several reasons. First, as we discuss in our Global Workforce Intelligence research, industries are overlapping. Every company is a digital company; every company wants to build recurring revenue streams; and soon every company will run on AI. Careers that used to stay within an industry are morphing into “skills-based careers,” enabling people to jump around more easily than ever before. Second, employees (particularly young ones) feel empowered to act as they wish. They may quietly quit, “work their wage,” or take time out to change careers. They see a long runway in their lives (people live much longer than they did in the 1970s and 1980s) so they don’t mind leaving your company to go elsewhere. Third, the fertility rate continues to drop and labor shortages will increase. Japan, China, Germany, and the UK all have shrinking workforce populations. And in the next decade or so, most other developed economies will as well. Fourth, labor unions are on the rise. Thanks to a new philosophy in Washington, we’ve seen labor activity at Google, Amazon, Starbucks, GM, Ford, Stellantis, Kaiser, Disney, Netflix, and others. While union participation is less than 11% of the US workforce, it’s much higher in Europe and this trend is up. What does all this mean? There are many implications. First, companies will be even more focused on building a high-retention model for work (some call it “labor hoarding.”) This means improving pay equity, continuing hybrid work models, investing in human-centered leadership, and giving people opportunities for new careers inside the company. This is why talent marketplaces, skills-based development, and learning in the flow of work are so important. Second, CEOs have to understand the needs, desires, and demands of workers. As the latest Edelman study shows, career growth now tops the list, along with the desire for empowerment, impact, and trust. A new theme we call “employee activation” is here: listening to the workforce and delegating decisions about their work to their managers, teams, and leaders. Third, the traditional “hire to grow” model will not always work. In this post-industrial age we have to operate systemically, looking at internal development, job redesign, experience, and hiring together. This brings together the silo’d domains of recruiting, rewards and pay, learning & development, and org design. (Read our Systemic HR research for more.) What does “business performance” really mean? If you’re a CEO you want revenue growth, market share, profitability, and sustainability. If you can’t grow by hiring (and employees keep “activating” in odd ways), what choice do you have? It’s pretty simple: you automate and focus on productivity. Why do I see this as the big topic in 2024? For three big reasons. First, CEOs care about it. The 2024 PwC CEO survey found that CEO’s believe 40% of the work in their company is wasted productivity. As shocking as that sounds, it rings true to me:  too many emails, too many meetings, messy hiring process, bureaucratic performance management, and more. (HR owns some of these problems.) Second, AI enables it. AI is designed to improve white-collar productivity. (Most automation in the past helped blue or gray collar workers.) Generative AI lets us find information more quickly, understand trends and outliers, train ourselves and learn, and clean up the mess of documents, workflows, portals, and back office compliance and administration systems we carry around like burdens. Third, we’re going to need it. How will you grow when it’s so hard to find people? Time to hire went up by almost 20% last year and the job market is getting even tougher. Can you compete with Google or OpenAI for tech skills? Internal development, retooling, and automation projects are the answer. And with Generative AI, the opportunities are everywhere. What does all this mean for HR? Well as I describe in the HR Predictions, we have a lot of issues to address. We have to accelerate our shift to a dynamic job and organization structure. We have to get focused and pragmatic about skills. We have to rethink “employee experience” and deal with what we call “employee activation.” And we are going to have to modernize our HR Tech, our recruiting, and our L&D systems to leverage AI and make these systems more useful. Our HR teams will be AI-powered too. As our Galileo™ customers already tell us, a well-architected “expert assistant” can revolutionize how HR people work. We can become “full-stack” HR professionals, find data about our teams in seconds instead of weeks, and share HR, leadership, and management practices with line leaders in seconds. (Galileo is being used as a management coach in some of the world’s largest companies.) There are some other changes as well. As the company gets focused on “growth through productivity,” we have to think about the 4-day week, how we institutionalize hybrid work, and how we connect and support remote workers in a far more effective way. We have to refocus on leadership development, spend more time and money on first line managers, and continue to invest in culture and inclusion. We have to simplify and rethink performance management, and we have to solve the vexing problem of pay-equity. And there’s more. DEI programs have to get embedded in the business (the days of the HR DEI Police are over). We have to clean up our employee data so our AI and talent intelligence systems are accurate and trustworthy. And we have to shift our thinking from “supporting the business” to “being a valued consultant” and productizing our HR offerings, as our Systemic HR research points out. All this is detailed in our new 40-page report “HR Predictions for 2024,” launching this week, including a series of Action Plans to help you think through all these issues. And let me remind you of a big idea. Productivity is why HR departments exist. Everything we do, from hiring to coaching to development to org design, is only successful if it helps the company grow. As experts in turnover, engagement, skills, and leadership, we in HR have make people and the organization productive every day. 2024 is a year to focus on this higher mission. One final thing: taking care of yourself. The report has 15 detailed predictions, each with a series of action steps to consider. The last one is really for you: focus on the skills and leadership of HR. We, as stewards of the people-processes, have to focus on our own capabilities. 2024 will be a year to grow, learn, and work as a team. If we deal with these 15 issues well, we’ll help our companies thrive in the year ahead. Details on the Josh Bersin Predictions The predictions study is our most widely-read report each year. It includes a detailed summary of all our research and discusses fifteen essential issues for CEOs, CHROs, and HR professionals. It will be available in the following forms: Webinar and launch on January 24: Register Here (replays will be available) Infographic with details: Available on January 24. Microlearning course on Predictions: Available on January 24. Detailed Report and Action Guide: Available to Corporate Members and Josh Bersin Academy Members (JBA).  (Note you can join the JBA for $495 per year and that includes our entire academy of tools, resources, certificate courses, and SuperClasses in HR.)
    Productivity
    2024年01月19日
  • Productivity
    Top 10 HR and People Analytics Themes of 2023 As we near the end of another successful year here at Insight222, we want to reflect on the top themes that have emerged in our content. From data-driven insights to real-world examples, our team has worked meticulously to deliver informative and persuasive articles that aim to enhance the HR and people analytics function. And we have seen some exciting changes and advancements in the field this year. So, without further ado, here are the top themes that have taken front stage in our content during 2023. Psychological Safety in the Workplace Psychological safety in the workplace has been proven time and time again that without it, a team cannot thrive. In fact, we like to think of it as the epitome of successful teams. Therefore, it's no surprise that this theme carries over from last year. Some of our most popular blogs discuss measuring psychological safety in the workplace, understanding how organisational culture impacts it and exploring how companies like Microsoft are transforming their organisational culture to prioritise psychological safety and promote a positive work environment. Behavioural Science in HR (Source: People Analytics Trends 2021) The integration of behavioural science into HR and people analytics practices has been gaining traction for the past few years, and this year was no exception. With the changing nature of skills and roles in HR, the need for understanding human behaviour and decision-making has become increasingly important in driving impactful business outcomes. With this, our article on exploring the role of behavioural science in HR and how it can be leveraged to improve employee engagement, performance, and productivity was one of our most popular reads of 2023. How AI is Changing the HR Landscape No discussion about the future of work is complete without considering the role of artificial intelligence (AI). (Source: The Impact of GPT and Generative AI Models on People Analytics (Interview with Andrew Marritt)) AI has been incorporated into HR for some time now. We have been using it to automate routine tasks, streamline recruitment processes and improve HR analytics. However, with the birth of generative AI models like Chat-GPT, it is an understatement to say that AI has revolutionised every aspect of HR. Better yet, it's safe to say that it has and will continue to revolutionise every business function within an organisation. From utilising AI in people analytics to how it is transforming the HR landscape, our articles on the impact of Chat-GPT and generative AI models and how AI is changing HR analytics have been among the most popular reads of this year. And for good reason - with the potential to improve decision-making, streamline processes, and enhance employee experience, AI is a topic every HR and people analytics professional should pay attention to. The Impact of Analytics on HR Our Insight222 research has shown time and time again that organisations that invest in people analytics drive better business outcomes, which is why, this year, we continued to dig deeper into this topic by exploring the New Model for People Analytics. With the rise of digital transformation and the increasing importance of data in driving strategic business decisions, our articles on using statistics to drive actionable outcomes, why people analytics is so important for HR, and how social capital can be measured have been highly sought-after reads. Upskilling the HR Function and Building Data Literacy at Scale Considering the previous points, it's understandable that upskilling the HR function and building data literacy at scale have emerged as key themes this year. To fully leverage the benefits of AI and data analytics, HR professionals must develop a strong understanding of data and how it can be used to drive strategic decision-making. As such, in July, we released our research, Upskilling the HR Profession: Building Data Literacy at Scale, which outlines the skills and competencies that HR professionals need to succeed in the digital age. It also highlights how HR leaders need to build an effective skill-based workforce planning capability. (Source: Measuring the ROI of Employee Training and Development) Interestingly, this research has also sparked discussions on who holds the responsibility for scaling data literacy across HR, which we explore in our article Who Holds the Responsibility for Scaling Data Literacy Across HR? Measuring the ROI of Employee Development Building upon the theme of upskilling and data literacy, it's important to also focus on measuring the ROI of employee development. As professionals in the HR sector, we know all too well that investing in employee training and development is crucial for an organisation's long-term success. But with senior executives increasingly asking (and expecting) HR to demonstrate the value of these investments, our article on measuring the ROI of employee training and development has been one of the most popular reads this year. Delivering Greater Value for the Business Through People Analytics At its core, people analytics is about delivering greater value for the business. Our 2022 research, Impacting Business Value: Leading Companies in People Analytics, is a testament to this. Leading Companies (organisations that drive the most business impact through people analytics) have consistently shown better financial performance, higher employee engagement and retention rates, and overall greater success compared to their less data-driven counterparts. This is why, in 2023, we have seen a surge of interest in articles on delivering greater value for the organisation with people analytics and the growing influence of people analytics in strategic business decisions. And this trend will only continue as more and more organisations recognise the importance of incorporating data-driven insights into their decision-making processes. Challenges to Building Data Literacy If there is one thing we have identified as a common theme this year, it's the challenges of building data literacy within HR. From understanding the technical aspects of data analysis to gaining buy-in from senior leadership, organisations face various hurdles when trying to build a culture of data literacy. (Source: Insight222 Research: Upskilling the HR Profession: Building Data Literacy at Scale) However, as we continue to uncover the value that analytics brings to HR and the business as a whole, these challenges will become easier to overcome. And with more resources and tools available to support data literacy efforts within organisations, we are confident that this theme will evolve in 2024. Evolving the HR Practice In all, as we wrap up another year, it's clear that people analytics and data-driven HR practices have become even more ingrained in our work. From the importance of psychological safety and behavioural science to the impact of AI, measuring ROI, and delivering greater value to the business - these are just a few key themes that have shaped our content this year. However, as we move forward, HR professionals must continue developing their data literacy and upskilling themselves to drive the success of their organisations further. To that end, we look forward to seeing how these themes will evolve and shape the future of HR in the coming years. Manpreet RandhawaDecember 18, 2023
    Productivity
    2023年12月22日
  • Productivity
    您需要了解的 19 个最重要的人力资源指标 In the complex, ever-evolving realm of human resources, effective decision-making is anchored in data-specific insights. This underlines the significance of HR metrics, which serve as key navigational beacons in the journey of driving business success. These metrics, or key performance indicators (KPI) – do not mix them with Key Result Areas (KRA), transform abstract aspects of HR management into quantifiable data, which can be measured, analyzed, and optimized. In this review, we will navigate through the 19 most crucial HR metrics, offering HR professionals and business leaders a comprehensive understanding of these powerful analytical tools. Table of Contents Key HR Metrics Number of Employees (FTEs) Employee Turnover Rate Voluntary Turnover Rate Employee Net Promoter Score (eNPS) Employee Engagement Employee Satisfaction Employee Experience Employee Value Recruitment Metrics Time to Hire Time to Fill Cost of Hire Compensation and Benefits Metrics Salary Range Penetration Salary Averages Pay Equity Pay Gap Gender Pay Gap Talent Development Metrics Employee Growth Rate Retention Rates Employee Performance Metrics Summary At the helm of these metrics are those concerning workforce management. Metrics such as employee turnover rate, retention rate, and absenteeism rate offer profound insights into the dynamics of the workforce. These HR metrics allow teams to assess workforce stability and employee engagement, and are instrumental in highlighting areas that need remedial action, contributing to enhancing workforce efficiency and fostering a positive organizational culture. Moreover, the spectrum of HR metrics extends to illuminate performance-based aspects, using data points like productivity rate, performance score, and training effectiveness. These metrics are invaluable in tracking skill enhancement, individual and team performances, and the efficacy of training initiatives. By analyzing these HR metrics, HR Managers can optimize talent management strategies, assisting in the creation of a high-performing, competitive workforce. Another significant category involves financial aspects including compensation competitiveness ratio and the cost of hiring. By yielding a clear perspective of the financial implications of HR policies, these metrics enable organizations to ensure their reward structures are market-competitive and recruitment processes are cost-effective. Armed with these HR metrics, management can strike an optimal balance between employee satisfaction and the organization’s financial health. 19 Most Important HR Metrics To encapsulate, the knowledge and understanding of these 19 imperative HR metrics provide a robust framework for strategic decision making in HR management. Each data point, each metric acts like a compass directing towards greater business success. They bravely shine the light on areas of improvement, success, and stagnation. By intelligently utilizing these HR metrics as outlined in the HRM Guide, HR leaders stand poised to significantly augment their human resource initiatives, thereby strengthening the backbone of their organizations. The relationship between HR Metrics and HR Analytics forms a powerful synergy that fuels informed decision-making. While HR Metrics offer quantifiable indicators of HR policies’ efficiency and effectiveness, HR Analytics dives deeper, harnessing these metrics to glean crucial insights and derive data-driven conclusions. This confluence of metrics and analytics is central to enhancing the overall effectiveness of HR management, ensuring that decisions made are grounded in empirical evidence and tailored to the organization’s evolving needs. In essence, the symbiosis between HR Metrics and HR Analytics paves the way for continuous improvement and strategic foresight, standing testament to the commitment of HR teams and organizations in nurturing and safeguarding the success of their people. Key HR Metrics In the sphere of Human Resource Management, informed decision-making is the cornerstone of effective practice. It is this that underscores the quintessential value of Key HR Metrics. These quantitative indicators reflect the efficiency and effectiveness of HR policies and operations, generating valuable insights that guide business strategy. Harnessing these metrics equips HR practitioners with a robust toolkit to measure, analyze, and optimize various aspects of HR processes. Navigating this vast array of metrics, a few distinguish themselves for their impact and universality. Among these are the Employee Net Promoter Score (eNPS), Employee Turnover Rate, and several other vital measures. The eNPS, a definitive metric of employee loyalty and job satisfaction, offers a transparent lens into the internal health of an organization. On the other hand, the Employee Turnover Rate stands as an indicator of organizational stability and workforce retention capacity. Thorough exploration and seamless integration of these key metrics play a pivotal role in honing effective HR strategies. Number of Employees (FTEs) Nestled within the cascade of HR metrics, the ‘Number of Employees’ or ‘Full-Time Equivalent’ (FTE) stands out as a fundamental measure of an organization’s human capital. This metric tracks the total number of full-time employees within the organization, encapsulating the breadth of the workforce at a glance. Understood across industries, FTE refers to the number of full-time employees that could have been employed if the reported number of hours worked by part-time employees had been worked by full-time employees. While seemingly straightforward, the value derived from this key metric extends far beyond a cursory headcount. A clear understanding of the Number of Employees (FTEs) serves as a vital foundation for resource planning and analysis. It aids in assessing the organization’s growth and expansion capacity, mapping the trajectory of workforce development, and determining if current staffing levels are aligned with the business goals. It also provides a clear picture of the scale at which HR policies and procedures operate, reinforcing the significance of understanding this measure within the larger HR Analytics structure. Ultimately, the metric mirrors the size and complexity of an organization’s human resources, guiding critical decisions about recruitment, retention, and resource allocation to align with the organization’s strategic objectives. Employee Turnover Rate Among the essential HR Metrics, the Employee Turnover Rate holds significant weight as a measure of workforce stability. This crucial metric gauges the rate at which employees exit an organization within a specified time frame, reflecting the tempo of attrition. An elevated turnover rate may be a symptom of underlying issues with job satisfaction, company culture, or a disconnect between employee expectations and organizational realities. By monitoring and analyzing this metric, HR specialists and business leaders alike can glean crucial insights into the overall health and attractiveness of their workplace. Understanding the Employee Turnover Rate assists organizations in identifying areas in need of improvement and implementing targeted interventions. A high turnover rate can profoundly impact a company’s bottom line, as the loss of experienced personnel often leads to increased recruitment costs and decreased productivity. Additionally, it may negatively affect the morale of the remaining workforce, as employees witness their peers departing, potentially eroding the organization’s internal cohesion. Conversely, a low Employee Turnover Rate often speaks to a thriving and nurturing work environment where employees are content and well-supported. It signifies that the organization has been successful in fostering a positive company culture, attractive compensation packages, and opportunities for personal and professional growth. Analyzing this metric in tandem with other HR Metrics, such as Employee Retention Rate and Employee satisfaction, can provide a comprehensive and holistic picture of the employee experience within the organization. To sum up, the Employee Turnover Rate is an indispensable tool that allows HR professionals to recognize the strengths and weaknesses of their talent management strategies effectively. Pivoting their initiatives and interventions based on this data, organizations are better equipped to create a more stable, engaged, and high-performing workforce. Recognizing the immense value of this metric and taking proactive steps to address unwanted fluctuations is a testament to an organization’s commitment to its people’s success and well-being. Voluntary Turnover Rate In the sphere of human resource management, deciphering the dynamics of employee attrition is of paramount importance. Here, an essential metric that provides specific insights is the Voluntary Turnover Rate. Distinct from overall turnover, this metric zeroes in on the number of employees who willingly choose to leave the organization. By analyzing this key performance indicator, HR managers and business leaders gain valuable understanding into the effectiveness of their employee retention strategies and overall workplace health. Unveiling the reasons behind voluntary departures empowers organizations to address potential lapses in their offerings and policies. Common drivers of voluntary turnover may include a lack of career advancement opportunities, insufficient compensation, or a misalignment of personal values with the organization’s culture. Identifying such factors through the lens of the Voluntary Turnover Rate enables HR teams to proactively design and implement relevant programs, cultivating a more nurturing, engaging work environment. Moreover, tracking the Voluntary Turnover Rate in combination with other HR metrics, such as Employee Satisfaction and Employee Retention Rate, can provide a comprehensive overview of employee engagement and commitment. By addressing the issues highlighted by these interrelated metrics, organizations ensure that they maintain a content and productive workforce willing to contribute to the company’s long-term vision. The Voluntary Turnover Rate serves as an eye-opening metric for understanding an organization’s employee retention capabilities. Through skillful analysis and thoughtful response, HR departments and business leaders can utilize this metric to sharpen their talent management strategies, sustain a resilient workforce, and ultimately, fortify their organization’s foundation by fostering a committed and satisfied team of professionals. Employee Net Promoter Score (eNPS) In the multifaceted domain of human resources, the Employee Net Promoter Score (eNPS) emerges as a powerful tool to measure employee satisfaction and engagement. This metric gauges the loyalty of employees by posing a simple, yet insightful question: How likely are they to recommend the company as a place to work? Built on the premise of the Net Promoter Score concept used in customer satisfaction, the eNPS distills the essence of employee sentiment into meaningful key data points that reflect their commitment and attachment to the organization. A profound understanding of the Employee Net Promoter Score offers HR professionals and business leaders not merely a numerical score, but valuable insights into the health and vitality of their organizational culture. By monitoring the fluctuations of this pivotal metric, organizations can identify trends, recognize areas of success, and spot aspects of the work environment that might require redress and reinforcement. Furthermore, the analysis of the eNPS in conjunction with related HR metrics provides a holistic perspective on the many elements influencing employee satisfaction. For instance, evaluating eNPS alongside Employee Turnover Rate or Employee Retention Rate can illuminate the intricate relationship between overall satisfaction and workforce stability. By harnessing the power of these interrelated data points, HR teams can tailor their strategies and interventions, ultimately fostering a nurturing environment that engenders employee commitment and loyalty. The Employee Net Promoter Score remains a cornerstone within the portfolio of HR metrics for assessing employee satisfaction and engagement. The wisdom and understanding that arise from the skillful interpretation of eNPS pave the way for optimizing employee experience and cultivating a resilient organization deeply invested in the success of its people. Embracing the opportunity to learn from the eNPS reflects an organization’s commitment to fostering a thriving culture, where employee satisfaction and well-being are at the core of its mission. Employee Engagement Employee Engagement is a vital HR metric that gauges the emotional investment and commitment of employees towards their work and the company. This measurement helps gauge the level of enthusiasm, loyalty, and dedication employees have for their roles within the organization. It directly impacts key performance indicators, such as productivity, turnover, and overall organizational performance. Simply put, employee engagement stems from the deeply human need for fulfillment in one’s work and plays a decisive role in the success of an organization. Delving deeper into Employee Engagement unveils its significance. High engagement levels often translate into a more motivated, resilient workforce that achieves higher productivity levels and fosters a lower turnover rate. Engaged employees are typically more loyal, invest greater effort into their work, and are likely to go the extra mile for the company’s success. Additionally, they form the backbone of a positive workplace culture, contributing to a harmonious, cooperative work environment. However, measuring Employee Engagement can be challenging, as it encompasses various key data points, including job satisfaction, loyalty, pride in their work, and the quality of relationships with co-workers and supervisors. Various tools like surveys and feedback sessions can gather these data points, which, when analyzed together, can provide a composite picture of the organization’s engagement health. In essence, Employee Engagement is an invaluable measurement within the HR metrics spectrum. Its findings shed light on the pulse of the organization, highlighting areas that require optimization to enhance job satisfaction, increase loyalty, and improve overall performance. Prioritizing and nurturing Employee Engagement reflects an organization’s commitment to its most critical resource – its people. It is a testament to the organization’s dedicated pursuit of achieving success by building a highly engaged and motivated workforce. Employee Satisfaction Within the dimensions of Human Resources Management, the metric of Employee Satisfaction stands as a direct barometer of how content employees are. It comprehensively measures their satisfaction levels with aspects like job roles, the work environment, organizational policies, and workflows. This critical metric transcends the mundane statistics, illuminating the subjective experiences and feelings of employees towards their workplace. Central to the robustness of the HR Processes, Employee Satisfaction harbors the potential to significantly influence an organization’s success trajectory. A workforce that is satisfied with their roles, feels valued, and finds alignment with organizational policies tends to exhibit higher productivity, lower turnover rates, and greater levels of engagement. It also underscores the positive aspects of an organization’s culture, reinforcing its attractiveness to prospective talent and bolstering its reputation in the job market. By undertaking regular Employee Satisfaction surveys and making this assessment an integral part of their Human Resources Management, organizations can amass valuable insights. These key data points then serve as a compass to navigate the planning and execution of HR policies, correcting course where needed and thus ensuring an environment that promotes satisfaction. To conclude, Employee Satisfaction (aka Employee Happiness) is not merely a measure of contentment. It is a testament to the effectiveness of the HR processes and the overall health of an organization. Prioritizing this critical metric helps build a workforce that is not just satisfied, but also engaged, productive, and committed to driving the organization’s success. Employee Experience A core metric within the domain of Human Resources Management is the Employee Experience. This term encompasses an employee’s entire journey within an organization, encapsulating every touchpoint from recruitment to exit. It includes their encounters with the organization’s culture, work environment, management philosophy, and HR Operating Rhythm. Essentially, it reflects how an employee perceives their interaction with the organization at large, offering a panoramic view of their professional journey. The depth and breadth of the Employee Experience shed light on critical aspects of the Human Resources Management strategy. It helps identify potential areas for improvement, and, perhaps more importantly, areas that are working well. This measure is not confined to the individual employee’s direct work-related tasks; it extends to cover the overarching environment, company culture, and sentiment within the organization. A positive experience fosters a feeling of inclusion, boosts engagement, improves job satisfaction, and reinforces a sense of loyalty. Accurate measurement of the Employee Experience requires a detailed understanding of the organization’s HR Operating Rhythm. It calls for a systematic, disciplined approach to assess each phase of an employee’s journey, from onboarding and integration to growth and eventually, their exit. Regular feedback sessions, pulse surveys, and open communication channels can serve as tools for capturing the nuances of Employee Experience reliably. The Employee Experience stands as a pillar in the realm of HR metrics. A thorough understanding of this metric empowers Human Resources Management to create a fulfilling, rewarding environment that positively influences every facet of the employees’ professional lives. In prioritizing Employee Experience, an organization reinforces its commitment to its most valuable asset–its people. This is instrumental in building a strong, vibrant, and high-performing workplace where each individual is fully engaged and aligned with the company’s vision and direction. Employee Value In the strategic framework of human resource management, Employee Value emerges as a critical metric. This term encapsulates the aggregate contribution an employee brings to an organization, assessed in light of key facets such as productivity, innovation, and teamwork. Effectively, it quantifies the unique worth of each employee within the organization, detailing their individual impacts on overall company performance. An employee’s value is intrinsically linked to their productivity. Higher employee productivity often directly translates to greater value for the organization. However, this metric extends beyond merely measuring task completion rates or output levels. It also encompasses the innovative capacities of the employee–their potential and demonstrated ability to introduce or improve processes, ideas, or products, thereby contributing to the organization’s evolution and growth. Further, the concept of Employee Value embraces the power of teamwork, recognizing the synergistic effects of cooperative, harmonious office relationships. The quality of interactions and collaborations, the readiness to assist colleagues, and the ability to effectively function within a team all contribute to an individual’s cumulative value to an organization. Understanding these dimensions through the lens of Employee Value illuminates the factors driving both individual and collective successes. The Employee Value stands as a comprehensive measure of an employee’s impact on an organization. It encompasses not only the tangible output in terms of employee productivity but also the softer aspects of innovation capacity and teamwork. A nuanced understanding and application of the Employee Value metric play a pivotal role in empowering HR leaders and business leaders alike, enabling them to enhance talent management strategies, foster a productive workplace, and drive their organization toward unparalleled success. Recruitment Metrics Recruitment Metrics serve as indispensable tools for HR managers and business leaders striving to optimize their talent acquisition process. These essential performance indicators, including time-to-hire, time-to-fill, and cost-of-hire, enable organizations to assess the efficacy, speed, and cost-effectiveness of their recruitment frameworks. By evaluating these key metrics, decision-makers can ensure that their talent acquisition strategies are aligned with the organization’s broader objectives while providing a seamless experience for both candidates and hiring managers. Central to the HR metrics ecosystem, Recruitment Metrics hold the key to detecting areas requiring streamlining, improvement, or an outright transformation in the recruitment journey. A comprehensive understanding of these metrics allows an organization to stay competitive in the job market, attract top talent, and fine-tune their recruitment strategies to bolster their workforce. In this context, time-to-hire, time-to-fill, and cost-of-hire metrics emerge as vital signposts guiding organizations toward the best practices for finding, hiring, and retaining exceptional candidates while striving for operational excellence. Time to Hire In the panorama of HR metrics, Time to Hire emerges as a key measure of efficiency within the recruitment process. It succinctly outlines the duration from when a job is posted to when a candidate accepts the offered role. A shorter Time to Hire often stands as an indicator of a more streamlined and efficient hiring process, reflecting the effectiveness of the recruitment strategies employed by an organization. Assessing Time to Hire provides valuable insights into the speed and efficacy of the recruitment function. A brief duration could signal a well-structured and efficient system capable of quickly attracting, evaluating, and securing suitable candidates. It may also imply a positive working relationship with hiring managers, facilitating swift decision-making and expediting the overall recruitment process. Conversely, a lengthier Time to Hire could indicate possible inefficiencies or bottlenecks that are slowing down the recruitment cycle. These could range from a lengthy decision-making process, difficulties in attracting the right candidates, to perhaps the absence of a robust recruitment platform or system. Understanding and analyzing this metric empowers an organization to undertake necessary revisions or enhancements to the recruitment process. Time to Hire is an essential recruitment metric, offering quantifiable evidence of the strengths and potential weak links within an organization’s recruitment process. Regular monitoring of this metric enables HR hiring specialists to uphold the efficiency and effectiveness of their recruitment practices, ensuring the organization remains competitive in the dynamic talent acquisition landscape. Having an optimized Time to Hire helps harness the full potential of the recruitment process, ensuring timely talent acquisition that aligns with the strategic growth objectives of the organization. Time to Fill At the heart of an organization’s talent acquisition process stands the crucial recruitment metric known as Time to Fill. This metric gauges the amount of time it takes to fill a vacant position, stretching from the moment a job opening is identified to the point when the selected candidate steps into the role. Time to Fill shines light on the efficiency of an organization’s hiring practices, offering valuable insights into potential bottlenecks or areas that may warrant improvement. A shorter Time to Fill typically reflects a well-orchestrated recruitment process, where vacant positions are rapidly filled, minimizing the adverse impacts of extended vacancies on the organization’s operational efficiency. Conversely, a protracted duration can signal complexities within the talent acquisition process that may require streamlining, or a case of substantial applicant volume making candidate selection challenging. Analyzing Time to Fill enables HR managers and business leaders to reveal and address any inefficiencies, reinforcing smoother, more effective hiring practices. Developing an understanding of Time to Fill is fundamental in fostering a more efficient talent acquisition process. Through the identification of friction points, organizations can take targeted measures such as optimizing job descriptions, refining selection criteria, or enhancing the interview process. These tailored strategies contribute to a more agile and proficient recruitment system, resulting in a competitive advantage in the quest for top talent. In summary, the Time to Fill metric serves as a vital indicator of the productivity and effectiveness of an organization’s talent acquisition process. Identifying areas for improvement can bolster overall efficiency, ensuring that businesses are well-positioned to swiftly hire the brilliant minds required to drive the organization to new heights. This metric not only measures the speed of the recruitment process but also signifies the organization’s commitment to selecting the best candidates for the job, thereby contributing to a sustainable, high-performing workforce. Cost of Hire In the realm of effective talent management strategies, understanding the Cost of Hire is of paramount importance. This financial metric delves into the costs associated with filling a vacant position, encompassing both direct and indirect expenses incurred during the talent acquisition process. Direct costs include job advertising fees, agency or recruiter fees, and background check costs. Indirect costs may incorporate time spent on candidate sourcing, interviewing, and onboarding across different organizational departments. A comprehensive overview of Cost of Hire offers indispensable insights to HR team members and business leaders, enabling them to evaluate their organizations’ recruitment efficiency and overall competitiveness. Evaluating the Cost of Hire is crucial in optimizing talent acquisition strategies, which, in turn, can profoundly influence an organization’s long-term success. By monitoring this metric, decision-makers can identify areas where cost savings and process improvements can be realized, minimizing excessive recruitment expenditure without compromising on the quality of hires. A solid grasp of Cost of Hire supports resource allocation and budgeting decisions, ensuring that organizations remain agile and capable of attracting top talent in the increasingly competitive job market. Efficient Cost of Hire management is vital to the sustenance and growth of an organization. By streamlining the talent acquisition process, HR professionals and business leaders can balance cost control with the pursuit of high-quality candidates, ultimately fostering a strong and vibrant workforce. Continued investment into refining recruitment strategies and processes will contribute to reductions in Cost of Hire while also positioning companies as attractive destinations for top talent. Assessing and managing the Cost of Hire is integral to the development and optimization of a company’s talent acquisition process. By examining these costs and identifying areas of potential improvement, organizations can refine their recruitment strategies, strike a balance between cost-efficiency, and quality hires, and solidify their foundation for enduring success. As a critical component of the recruitment metrics toolkit, the Cost of Hire serves as a key investment in the prosperity and future of the organization and its employees. Compensation and Benefits Metrics Amplifying the potency of an organization’s human resources strategy necessitates a comprehensive understanding of Compensation and Benefits Metrics. These crucial benchmarks, encapsulating aspects like pay gaps, salary averages, and more, guide HR managers and business leaders in making informed decisions about their organizations’ compensation structures. With these metrics at their disposal, professionals are better equipped to foster a fair, competitive, and enticing workplace, uplifting both employee satisfaction and organizational performance. Beyond merely representing numbers, Compensation and Benefits Metrics carry significant implications for talent acquisition, retention, and overall employee engagement. Drawing a clear picture of current compensation structures and comparing them to market standards can yield deep insights and illuminate areas for potential improvement. By closing pay gaps, aligning salary averages with industry standards, and delivering competitive benefits packages, organizations can showcase a palpable commitment to their employees’ welfare, ultimately underpinning a rock-solid foundation for sustainable success. Salary Range Penetration At the nexus of effective compensation management is the critical metric known as Salary Range Penetration. This evaluates how closely an employee’s salary matches the market or industry standards, ensuring businesses offer a competitive compensation package. Here, the Total Cost of compensation incorporates the entire salary spectrum—from minimum to maximum—considering various job roles and levels within an organization. The central role of Salary Range Penetration is to measure the employee’s pay position within the organization’s established salary range. This can help determine if the compensation offered aligns with industry benchmarks and remains attractive to both the current workforce and potential hires. By understanding where an employee’s salary stands in relation to these ranges, HR managers and business leaders can make informed decisions about pay increases, promotions, or adjustments needed to remain competitive. An efficient Salary Range Penetration system is vital for HR Compensation and Benefits managers in maintaining equity and transparency in compensation practices. Regular reviews and adjustments inspired by this metric can ensure the workforce feels valued, subsequently fostering higher levels of job satisfaction and commitment. By being mindful of this metric, organizations can shape an equitable pay structure that securely aligns the interest of employees and the strategic objectives of the company. Salary Range Penetration offers in-depth insights that fuel fair and competitive pay structures within organizations. By constantly monitoring and adjusting this measure, organizations can ensure their compensation strategies align with market standards, positively impacting employee satisfaction, and, ultimately, retention. Recognizing and acting upon the nuances of this metric is an investment in your people’s contentment and your organization’s long-term success. Salary Averages In the realm of fair and competitive compensation practices, understanding the concept of Salary Averages stands central. Salary Averages refer to the mean salary within an organization or a specific role. It essentially entails a comprehensive evaluation of the sum of all salaries divided by the total number of employees. This metric enables HR professionals and managers to maintain a balance in their internal pay structure while also considering relevant external costs. The value of Salary Averages is reflected in its ability to influence both internal and external costs tied to employee compensation. Internally, it aids in maintaining equity within the organization, ensuring a balanced distribution of compensation centered around fair market value. Externally, comprehending this metric efficiently allows companies to remain competitive in the market by offering attractive compensation packages that can attract and retain talent. Calculating and monitoring Salary Averages affords organizations a clearer lens through which to view potential disparities or imbalances in their pay structure. By identifying these gaps, companies can take corrective measures to ensure equitable pay among employees, fostering an environment of transparency and fairness. This conscious and conscientious practice not only strengthens employee relations but also encourages a more dedicated and motivated workforce. Salary Averages serve as a critical component of a balanced and competitive compensation practice. The insights derived from it throw light on both internal and external costs associated with employee compensation. This, in turn, equips organizations with the knowledge needed to ensure a fair, transparent, and competitive remuneration system—an instrumental cornerstone to fostering a satisfied and high-performing workforce. Pay Equity Centered at the heart of a constructive, diverse, and inclusive workforce is the core HR metric known as Pay Equity. It ensures that all employees receive fair compensation for their work and contributions, regardless of their gender or other demographic factors. The primary purpose of this metric is to foster a culture of equality, aligning with the principles of diversity and inclusion. Pay Equity helps eliminate unjustifiable disparities in the workforce relating to compensation. It is a reflection of an organization’s commitment towards upholding fairness by assessing and adjusting pay scales based solely on factors such as role, experience, and performance. With Pay Equity, HR leaders and business leaders commit to a critical investment in ensuring that their compensation practices do not discriminate but, instead, respect diversity and promote inclusion. Practicing Pay Equity necessitates regular monitoring and adjustments of pay strategies. It may involve conducting equity audits, examining pay practices, and implementing relevant policies that ensure fair compensation. The process extends beyond just remuneration and reflects the organization’s values, translating to higher employee satisfaction, improved employer branding, and fostering a culture that truly values diversity and inclusion. Pay Equity is not merely a metric; it’s an organizational commitment towards fostering a workplace culture that upholds the principles of equality, diversity, and inclusion. By driving pay practices that ensure equitable compensation, businesses can strengthen their employer brand, enhance employee loyalty, and build a robust foundation of trust and mutual respect. Pay Equity, thus, is less a choice and more a responsibility that organizations must shoulder in their quest for sustainable success. Pay Gap In the landscape of fair and equitable compensation practices, addressing the issue of the Pay Gap is a non-negotiable priority. Broadly speaking, this term refers to variations in pay across not only genders but also across different demographic, racial, and cultural groups. Comprehensive understanding of the concept of Pay Gap ensures that organizations adopt a sincerely fair approach to employees, emphasizing the principle of internal equity in compensation models. The Pay Gap is not merely about discerning salary discrepancies; it provides important insights into deeper systemic issues that might exist within an organization. Adjusting for these gaps is crucial for fostering a sense of fairness among employees and maintaining internal equity. This involves understanding these differences, identifying their origins, and devising systematic interventions to ensure equitable pay across all levels and roles. Efficient management of the Pay Gap necessitates close collaboration with HR managers and business leaders. This involves scrutinizing internal salary data, benchmarking against external markets, and rolling out policies that uphold equitable compensation. The commitment to narrowing and eventually eliminating the Pay Gap is a testament to an organization’s dedication to a fair approach to employees. Addressing the Pay Gap is a critical step towards establishing fairness and equality in compensation across all layers of an organization. Tackling this problem fosters a sense of internal equity, resulting in improved employee morale and productivity. As directly linked to a fair approach to employees, successful management of the Pay Gap is a substantial boon to the overall organizational health and reputation. Gender Pay Gap In the spectrum of fair compensation, addressing the Gender Pay Gap is of paramount importance. This metric underlines the salary disparity between male and female employees performing the same work. The alignment of the Gender Pay Gap to equitable pay scales is key in promoting workplace equality and maintaining internal equity. Firstly, let’s understand what the Gender Pay Gap is. It’s the differential between the average earnings of male and female employees, considering they are in identical roles with similar experience and performance. A noteworthy point is that a “gap” indicates a disparity, not justified by professional factors, signaling that there are elements beyond work performance influencing compensation. Such inequalities can undermine the spirit of fairness, negatively impacting the work environment and an organization’s ethical stature. The inevitability of addressing the Gender Pay Gap signals a commitment towards valuing a fair and balanced compensation strategy. By recognizing and actively responding to these discrepancies, organizations cement their commitment to internal equity. Revisiting pay structures, conducting thorough equity audits, and cultivating an environment of open dialogue about compensation are measures that can help in overcoming these challenges. Analyzing and working to lessen the Gender Pay Gap is more than an HR metric; it is a significant stride towards forging an equitable, inclusive workplace. The conscious examination and rectification of these disparities serve as a testament to an organization’s investment in their people, contributing to enhanced organizational morale and overall productivity. Prioritizing a sphere of pay equality is a critical contributor to achieving internal equity in the workplace. Talent Development Metrics In the evolving landscape of Human Resources, the collection, analysis, and interpretation of HR Metrics form a cornerstone for success. One subset of these vital metrics, particularly significant for both the HR Professional and the holistic growth of an organization, is the realm of Talent Development Metrics. These work to quantitatively measure the efficiency and impact of the organization’s talent development and training programs, fueling strategic decision-making and enhancing overall operational efficiency. Talent Development Metrics offer insight into the effectiveness of the company’s employee development strategies. These metrics range from gauging the reach, relevance, and responsiveness of training programs to measuring resultant employee performance and retention levels. While effectively broadening the scope of traditional employee metrics, these data points serve as a critical tool in assessing employee skill growth, job satisfaction, and, ultimately, boosting business productivity. Employee Growth Rate The Employee Growth Rate is a critical HR metric that helps assess this capability. By monitoring the development and promotion rate of employees within an organization, this metric highlights the effectiveness of training and development programs while signaling a truly forward-thinking learning organization. An organization’s deliberate focus on Employee Growth Rate is the embodiment of its commitment to competency-based learning. By tracking advancements, skill enhancements, and career progressions, this metric stresses the importance of investing in people. At the same time, it also serves as a valuable input for decision-makers looking to improve existing development programs, create new opportunities for growth, and better align workforce skills with strategic business goals. Employee Growth Rate, when viewed as a part of the bigger picture, is transformative. It elevates human capital, enhances employee engagement, and promotes exceptional performance. As a direct result, this results in increased levels of job satisfaction and employee retention. When it comes to a business performance perspective, an environment that nurtures talent and encourages growth leads to a more agile, effective, and adaptive workforce, enabling an organization to thrive in an ever-changing market. The Employee Growth Rate serves as an insightful measure of an organization’s dedication to cultivating a learning organization. Paying close attention to this metric and taking data-driven, empathetic actions reflects an organization’s commitment to its people, ultimately ensuring that it stays on a path of continuous growth. Embracing the Employee Growth Rate is a testament to an organization’s focus on competency-based learning, its appreciation for individual aspirations, and its unwavering pursuit of sustained business performance. Retention Rates In a world where employees are the linchpin of business success, Retention Rates serve as a crucial HR metric. This metric quantifies how well a company retains its employees over a period, effectively revealing insights into job satisfaction levels and the overall company culture. Keeping a keen eye on Retention Rates is central to the sustained effectiveness of a learning organization. Retention Rates are more than just numbers. They are indicative of an organization’s ability to maintain a competent, motivated workforce. High retention rates usually point towards positive job satisfaction and a supportive company culture. On the contrary, low retention rates may signal potential challenges that need to be addressed. These could include aspects related to competency-based learning, compensation, employee engagement, or opportunities for growth and development. Studying Retention Rates enables HR professionals and business leaders to identify areas of improvement within the organization. These insights guide decision-making processes around recruitment, onboarding, training, rewards, and recognition systems. An organization that thrives on high retention rates is likely to have a team of committed employees on board, willing to contribute to improved business performance. Such an organization tends to exude a positive ambiance, advantageous for its reputation as an employer, and its customer relationships. In a nutshell, Retention Rates are a vital health check of an organization. They portray how effectively an organization cultivates a climate of employee satisfaction and continuous growth, in line with principles of a learning organization. By focusing on Retention Rates, businesses can significantly influence competency-based learning, drive enhanced employee job satisfaction, and sculpt an empowering company culture, all of which are essentials for elevated business performance. Employee Performance Metrics At the heart of a successful business are its employees and their performance. Employee Performance Metrics offer a systematic lens to evaluate individual productivity and effectiveness. By providing a measure of an employee’s contributions and accomplishments, these metrics serve as an essential tool to comprehend and enhance workforce capabilities, a critical aspect of any learning organization. The scope of Employee Performance Metrics is broad and multifaceted, capturing a spectrum of data points such as quality and quantity of work, adherence to deadlines, job knowledge, and innovation. By providing clear and accurate information of individual employee contributions, these metrics aid HR professionals and business leaders in decision-making processes. They shed light on areas for improvement, identify potentials for promotion, and inform strategies for competency-based learning initiatives. The power of these metrics extends beyond individual employees and has the capacity to transform the entire organization. A workforce that is regularly assessed and guided using performance metrics is more likely to be engaged, motivated, and productive. This engagement and productivity directly impact the operational efficiency of the organization, contributing to enhanced business performance. Employee Performance Metrics provide valuable insights into an organization’s most valuable asset, its people. By focusing on these metrics, organizations can create a proactive workforce, inspire continued learning, and drive performance growth, making them an indispensable feature of a well-functioning learning organization. They are the lynchpin that ties individual performance to competency-based learning and business performance, creating a synergetic environment that benefits employees and organizations alike. Summary Summary For HR leaders and organizational leaders, understanding a variety of key HR metrics is nothing short of essential. By successfully interpreting and actioning the insights from these 19 HR metrics, decision-makers equip themselves with the knowledge to effectively manage and enhance multiple areas of their human resource initiatives. These metrics not only help in shaping a productive and content workforce but also contribute tangibly to an organization’s future success. Diving deep into employee satisfaction, organizations must adopt a systematic approach to gauge the happiness and well-being of their workforce. By accurately capturing the significance of various factors that influence satisfaction, HR metrics enable organizational leaders to make informed decisions, fostering an uplifting workplace atmosphere where employees feel acknowledged, motivated, and valued. Retention rates, on the other hand, hold a mirror to the overall company culture, illuminating aspects that may need improvement, or areas that are flourishing. Consequently, these metrics facilitate effective action plans that drive harmonious cultures and stable employee longevity. The connection between a satisfied employee base and an efficient workforce highlights the core importance of retaining human capital for success in any business. In conclusion, comprehending and leveraging these key HR metrics is an indispensable requirement for building a robust and thriving organization that stands the test of time. HR teams, armed with these insights, play a crucial role in weaving together a genuinely outstanding company tapestry. By nurturing employees through informed, empathetic decisions, organizations can strengthen the foundations of their workforce, ensuring long-lasting success sustained by satisfied, productive, and fulfilled employees.
    Productivity
    2023年12月10日
  • Productivity
    驾驭寒冬:为员工敬业度下降做好准备" "Forrester 预测 2024 年员工体验的寒流将来临 Forrester 的一位专家表示,公司“总体上对员工体验不太感兴趣”,因此很容易成为削减成本或偷工减料的目标。 在大流行导致的人才短缺期间,在投资改善员工体验后,雇主普遍都在缩减开支,这可能会影响员工对工作的感受以及雇主的底线。 Forrester在其《2024 年预测:工作的未来》报告中发现,员工体验将在 2024 年退居二线,从而导致他们所谓的“EX 冬天”。(2023 年,员工和雇主的工作场所都充满了挑战。不幸的是,我们在 2024 年看到了更多同样的情况——员工体验 (EX) 全面衰退,雇主们不再关注这一点。EX 的商业案例仍然比以往任何时候都强大,但许多领导者仍然难以倾听员工的意见并将他们的担忧付诸行动。到 2024 年,我们还将看到人工智能在工作场所的崛起,其中对生成式人工智能的投资激增。在 EX 减少和 AI 增加的环境中提高生产力将是一个核心挑战。) Forrester 未来工作团队副总裁兼首席分析师 JP Gownder 表示,公司“总体上对员工体验不太感兴趣”,因此很容易成为削减成本或偷工减料的目标。提高参与度、生产力和最终增长的战略正在被取消。 例如,Forrester 指出,从 2022 年到 2023 年,表示为内部 DEI 职能提供资金的雇主数量从受访者的三分之一下降到 27%;该公司预计,到 2024 年底,这一比例将进一步下降至 20%。他表示,一些公司将默认勾选一个复选框,表示他们已实现 DEI 目标,而不是真正为对员工产生影响的 DEI 计划提供资金。 高德尔说,原因之一是劳动力市场不再那么紧张。“通常,当员工流失较多或工作进展不顺利而无法留住人才时,雇主会投资于员工体验,”他说,就像“大辞职”期间的情况一样。 现在情况已不再是这样了。当公司“不那么迫切地想留住人才时,他们通常会在人才方面松开油门”。 Forrester 发现,他们可能会花钱,但可能不会以正确的方式花钱:66% 从事软件工作的技术决策者表示,他们将在 2024 年增加对 EX/人力资本管理软件的投资,但这些投资不会充分利用他们的优势。相反,Forrester 预测这些投资将提高人力资源职能的效率,而不是改善 EX 成果。 员工体验的冬天将继续冻住员工 Forrester 表示,2022 年至 2023 年间,员工敬业度已经出现下滑,并将在 2024 年继续下滑。 2022 年至 2023 年间,美国员工敬业度从 48% 下降至 44%,文化能量从 69% 下降至 66%。Forrester 预测,到 2024 年,这些数字将分别下降至 39% 和 64%。 Gownder 表示,员工敬业度作为员工体验的衡量标准“对于生产力、创造力以及激发人们工作中的大部分兴趣和动力至关重要”。“如果你失去了这一点,那么人们就没有全力以赴,也没有充分利用他们的工作。” 他说,这损害了公司的整体利益。“当你取消对员工体验的投资,然后重新削减成本,并将员工仅仅视为资源而不是有价值的合作伙伴时,你的组织就会发现敬业度下降,因此其他事情也会下降。” Forrester表示,从2022年到2023年,员工参与度已经大幅下降,并将在2024年继续下降。 从2022年到2023年,美国的员工参与度从48%下降到44%,文化活力从69%下降到66%。Forrester预测,到2024年,这些数字将分别下降到39%和64%。 在别人盲目跟随时保持独立思考 Gownder补充说,并非所有都失去了。通过反其道而行之,保持积极的投入,可以避免EX的冬天。这意味着要真正投入与员工的互动,而不是削减成本或依赖于虚假的检查清单。 他说:“员工体验论断指出,投资于员工,在以人为中心的体验中提高参与度,降低流失率,提高生产力,也会让客户更加满意,因为快乐的员工会带来快乐的客户。” 他说,对于那些将继续投资于员工体验的公司,他们还应该衡量和理解员工对这些投资的感受。“这两件事往往是相辅相成的。” 而听力部分常常被抛在后面。Forrester 在报告中发现,只有 31% 的业务和技术专业人士认为改善员工体验是首要任务,同时也认为收集员工反馈是他们为提升员工体验而采取的一项关键行动。Forrester 预计到 2024 年这一比例将增至 34%。 原文访问:https://www.hrdive.com/news/is-an-employee-experience-winter-coming/701428/
    Productivity
    2023年12月07日
  • 12